Watch ‘Indomation’ – A Stop-Motion Jurassic Park Tribute!

Before Dennis Muren wowed Steven Spielberg with computer generated dinosaurs at ILM, the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park were going to animated by hand by Phil Tippett and his team, using a technique known as stop motion.

The release of Jurassic Park led to an industry shift, with this well crafted art form rapidly replaced by computer generated images. This technology opened up a world of possibilities and filmmakers of the era began to experiment.

However, the animation technique did not die out. Stop motion lives on through the likes of Phil Tippett and his Mad God series, and many modern day movies like Isle of Dogs, Coraline and the works of Aardman Animations.

A number of independent filmmakers have dived into the stop motion world, including Mason Drumm who created the following short film entitled Indomation. Check it out below:

The entire piece contains 93 hours of animation and contains 7,830 frames! The set took two months to construct, utilizing 35 sticks of glue and many, many props. A detailed behind the scenes video gives us a better look at how Mason pieced all of this together. The rotating set is ingenious – so simple yet so effective.

Click the above picture to watch the 10 minute behind the scenes feature – I recommend you do! Stop motion is a slow process and one that takes immense concentration and attention to detail. To say he was the sole animator on Indomation, Mason’s animation is fluid, and it’s clear that he had a vision for this project from the very beginning – one that he executed with great finesse.

I’m looking forward to seeing more of his work. Be sure to check out Mason’s YouTube channel and let him know if you liked his short film by commenting below!

Jurassic World: Evolution Inspired Fan Meetup Happening in London this March!

Open up your calendar as it’s time for another Jurassic Park community meetup!

Frequent collaborator Tom Jurassic is hosting a Jurassic World Evolution Unofficial Community Meetup on Friday 8th March at the Natural History Museum in London.

The meetup will take place from 1pm – and Tom has already promised a host of fun activities, Jurassic-themed goodies and more for anyone who takes the time to join him in London. Tom has also revealed another detail of this meetup for fans of Jurassic Outpost:

“Firstly – I really appreciate all the support from everyone in spreading word about the meetup! Both Jurassic Outpost and The Jurassic Park Podcast have been amazing in getting word out there – allowing me to focus on some behind-the-scenes work which has enabled something incredibly cool to occur! I am beyond excited to reveal that Paul from the Natural History Museum’s Dinosaur Lab will be giving an hour’s talk to people who come down for the meetup – with the talk taking place from 1:30pm – 2:30pm. The Natural History Museum do talks here and there, but they are something which the general visitor will not be able to access.

I’m super excited to be able to bring a little more to the Jurassic World Evolution Unofficial Community Meetup – building a special day which I hope Jurassic fans who can make it will remember for years to come!”

This sounds like a fantastic opportunity for those attending – allowing people to get more hands-on with the museum than they would usually be able to!

Tom’s put a lot of work into this meetup and like any Jurassic community meetup there will no doubt be a favourable turnout! If you’re in or around the London area be sure to try and make it.

The Natural History Museum in London features one of the most beautiful and comprehensive collections of palaeontological discoveries in the country, which you’ll have the chance to come face to face with! The museum hosts popular dinosaurs like the T-Rex and the Triceratops, alongside the star of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; the Baryonyx.

As Tom states: “We’ll take part in some fun Jurassic-themed games, and they’ll be a host of awesome Evolution prizes and goodies to give out throughout the day.”

A schedule for the day is still being locked down – but there is plenty to do in South Kensington including the Science Museum, so after spending a good amount of time at the Natural History Museum there will still be plenty more fun in store. The best part about all of this? The museums are all free entry!

You can learn more about Tom’s community meetup here, and be sure to let us know in the comments section below if you’ll be making it down!

Exclusive: Colin Trevorrow Shares His Experiences with ‘Fallen Kingdom’ + Talks Hopes for ‘Jurassic World 3’!

“My instinct is to break the classical language of these films a bit and plunge us into a world that feels real and naturalistic. I want to go outside into environments we’ve never seen these animals in. I’m watching a lot of Planet Earth.”

The excitement for a new Jurassic Park movie is a feeling that cannot be shaken by fans, and with Fallen Kingdom still fresh in everyone’s minds, we spoke with Jurassic World 3 director Colin Trevorrow who teased his plans for the upcoming sequel!

Along with those teases we speak about the fandom and the interactivity that Twitter can provide, Colin discusses his writing partner Emily Carmichael and what brought them together as co-writers, we talk the dinosaurs of the franchise, and Colin hints at a wealth of expanded universe content to follow in the future.

Grab your soda from the vending machine and enjoy the read, this is a good one!


When you were first approached for Jurassic Park 4, did you ever think you would be here today in the position you have with Jurassic? What lessons have you learned along the way?

It’s been a ride. Something happens around 40—you’ve lived long enough to look back and identify things about yourself that you realize are embedded pretty deep. I’ve seen patterns in my own work that have helped me understand myself a bit more. All of my films tend to be about a character who gets better, someone who is approaching life in a way that doesn’t represent their best self and then changes dramatically. Darius in Safety Not Guaranteed, Claire in Jurassic World, Susan in The Book of Henry. They’re all characters who have fallen into a pattern that needs to change, and through extraordinary circumstances they find a path to the better versions of themselves. If I’ve learned one lesson, it’s that I share something with the characters and stories I’m attracted to. I want to be the best version of myself, both as a filmmaker and as a person.

How did you meet your new writing partner on the next movie, Emily Carmichael, and what do you believe she will bring to the Jurassic franchise?

I saw a short of Emily’s called “The Hunter and the Swan Discuss Their Meeting”. I just knew immediately that I loved her brain. It’s different. Like a child who went to Harvard but still plays with toys. I brought a script of hers to Steven and we offered her a job writing a script she’s going to direct. She started going to meetings and her career took off. She worked on Pacific Rim 2 with a few other writers, then wrote The Black Hole for Disney on her own. It wasn’t hard to make the case that she should join the family. Her enthusiasm has been pretty infectious. She’s also an excellent Dungeon Master, as my kids will attest.

How involved are you with designing and choosing the dinosaurs, old and new, for each film? What is that process like, and what informs your choices? By design and definition, are there certain key elements you feel set Jurassic dinosaurs apart from others?

I’ve been lucky enough to be able to choose the dinosaurs, but Derek Connolly and JA Bayona and now Emily Carmichael will have each made contributions when it’s all said and done. It’s just a bunch of kids sitting on the floor with their toys. It’s the best part of my job, but also the hardest. You have to keep some great ones in the tank. I love the Carnotaurus and the Baryonyx, but I didn’t want to just see them in the background in Jurassic World. They deserve an entrance. So we put them on the park map, but held the reveal for the second film. The next film is even more fun because the opportunities have really opened up.

You’ve said Jurassic World 3 will have the most accurate dinosaurs yet. What exactly does that mean for a Jurassic film, feathers or otherwise, and what – if any – lessons have you learned from designing dinosaurs on the past two films?

We’re not looking to alter the dinosaurs from the previous movies. Those are established characters to me—they were made with reptilian DNA bridging the gaps in the genome and they have their own identity. But now we’re headed into a world in which the ability to clone a dinosaur is no longer exclusive to Dr. Henry Wu. That leads to innovation, and new opportunities for us to introduce species that represent the full spectrum of our knowledge.


Artwork by Simon Stålenhag – not related to Jurassic World 3

Many assume Jurassic World 3 will feature dinosaurs terrorizing cities and suburbs, and fans are often referring to properties like Godzilla and Planet of the Apes. Are these connections a fair assumption, or do you plan to keep the dinosaurs in the wilder, more untamed landscapes?

I just have no idea what would motivate dinosaurs to terrorize a city. They can’t organize. Right now we’ve got lethal predators in wild areas surrounding cities all over the world. They don’t go pack hunting for humans in urban areas. The world I get excited about is the one where it’s possible that a dinosaur might run out in front of your car on a foggy backroad, or invade your campground looking for food. A world where dinosaur interaction is unlikely but possible—the same way we watch out for bears or sharks. We hunt animals, we traffic them, we herd them, we breed them, we invade their territory and pay the price, but we don’t go to war with them. If that was the case, we’d have lost that war a long time ago.

“Jurassic World 3” or “Jurassic Park 6”? Ultimately a subtitle will replace the numbers, but is there a chance the ‘Park’ branding will return?

Emily and I call it Jurassic Park 6 because it’s fun, and that’s what it is to us. This is the conclusion of a story that began 25 years ago, and I think fans will be fired up when they see how much we’re connecting it to the source material. I know Jurassic World didn’t feel like a sequel in a traditional sense—the title change probably contributed to that—but it was. And so is this.

Will the visual style of Jurassic World 3 be influenced at all by what JA Bayona and Oscar Faura brought to the table?

JA and Oscar shot a beautiful film. If I’m being honest, I’d say they shot such a beautiful film, I’m not even looking to try and match it. They achieved something so gorgeous to look at, my instinct is to break the classical language of these films a bit and plunge us into a world that feels real and naturalistic. I want to go outside into environments we’ve never seen these animals in. I’m watching a lot of Planet Earth.

Jurassic as a brand handles itself quite differently than other mega- franchises out there – from your direct interactions with the community, to the inclusion of fans to create content like Masrani Global and the Dinosaur Protection Group. How important is that to you, and how would you say it helps Jurassic excel?

Our collaboration with the fans was something I first asked for back in 2015, and Universal was really open to it. The team delivered such a great experience with Masrani Global, we gave them a new assignment on Fallen Kingdom, and they crushed that, so we’re really going to be able to expand on that relationship with the third film. It always seemed obvious to me—who knows more about this lore than the fans? Why not just give them the keys and let them drive?

Did any fan and/or critical feedback to Jurassic World help shape your approach to writing Fallen Kingdom?

It did. We definitely took a turn into the darker side of Jurassic Park with that script. The first film was such a bright, colorful pop adventure. With Fallen Kingdom, we were looking to explore the uglier side of humanity and our cruel treatment of living creatures. But I think Bayona kept us from going too far—he embraced the darker elements, but also brought his own sense of playfulness and humor to the proceedings. When we initially wrote the dinosaur auction, we were imagining a dirty, unsavory bunch of animal traffickers huddled in a basement, trading lives for money. He turned it into the sequence you see in the film, which was more like a Sotheby’s auction for the super-wealthy. I think it played much better for kids, and was the right choice when balanced against the poor treatment of the animals we were seeing, which could have become irreparably sad. That’s the benefit of working with another director—you can see different sides of the story through their eyes.

Fan service has become a huge point of debate with larger franchise films. Striking a happy balance seems to be no easy task.

The fans keep my compass pointed in the right direction. Deep fans watch movies differently than the casual viewer, the same way critics watch films differently than the general audience. None of them are wrong. So I do a lot of listening. And every year, more dinosaur fans are born. These movies need to work simultaneously for those kids, for adults who love the old films, and for a diverse global audience—including some who didn’t even have American movies available to them when the first film came out. It’s a delicate balance. I feel like I’ve made a mix of bold choices and safe ones—hopefully once my tenure is done, the fans will look back and feel like I was a careful custodian.

Can you talk about your experience with social media? You directly engage with fans on various subjects. But amongst all that can come a lot of toxic trolling. How do you filter that?

You really can’t filter it. But when you dig deep enough into any fan’s anger, you’re going to find a deep love for the franchise they’re defending. To understand that level of passion—and sometimes furor—requires the same respect and tolerance you give to those with different belief systems than your own. But belief is no excuse for aggression toward those who don’t share your beliefs. It makes me sad to see the current state of the discourse, because the ugly rhetoric we’re throwing at each other is polarizing fandom the same way our politics is dividing us. I hope we find our balance again. I think we can.

It seems you are overseeing the greater Jurassic expanded universe, both in content and canon – is that correct? Can you talk a little about what your involvement is like with that?

Yeah, I’ve been involved since 2015, in collaboration with Steven and Frank. We’ve been working closely with Universal to build out the world and make sure that kids (and adults) who want to dig deeper have someplace to go. We’re really proud of the Mattel and LEGO toys, the console and mobile games from Frontier and Ludia, the VR experience from Felix and Paul, who are just brilliant. We just finished a two-part animated LEGO special that will air on NBC this week. All our creative partners have done awesome work. There’s a lot of things I can’t really talk about, I promise there will be no shortage of new developments in the next few years. But we’re being careful not to oversaturate. Some people just want to go see a dinosaur movie every three years, and that’s fine. Others want dinosaurs all the way down. We’re here for them, too.

Why do you think Jurassic has succeeded in making dinosaur movies work – something that would normally just become another creature feature, into something that is able to thrill and captivate audiences like the Jurassic franchise has done? Do you believe bringing that magic to life gets more difficult with each movie?

I think there’s something humbling about dinosaurs. They’re evidence that we’ve only occupied the earth for a tiny sliver of time. The line that encapsulates the whole series for me is Irrfan Khan’s moment at the beginning of Jurassic World. “Dinosaurs remind us how very small we are, how new.” Humans have only existed for 200,000 years. Dinosaurs were here in one form or another for 170 MILLION years. We act like this planet belongs to us, but we just got here. That’s the story I’m here to tell, and every choice we make is connected to it.

Now that certainly is a lot to digest! While ‘dinosaurs in war’ is an idea that’s been floated around for years, was featured in John Sayles’ Jurassic Park 4 script, and was even hinted at by a main character in Jurassic World, it’s great than Colin continues to shut this idea down in exchange for a much more realistic portrayal of wild animals in the ‘human’ world.

“The world I get excited about is the one where it’s possible that a dinosaur might run out in front of your car on a foggy backroad, or invade your campground looking for food. A world where dinosaur interaction is unlikely but possible—the same way we watch out for bears or sharks.”

Me too Colin, me too. This world would allow for the suspense and thriller aspects of Jurassic Park to return, and is going to allow us to see these dinosaurs interacting with new environments. Environments that aren’t restrained by the jungles of Isla Nublar and Isla Sorna, and instead feel much closer to home.

“My instinct is to break the classical language of these films a bit and plunge us into a world that feels real and naturalistic. I want to go outside into environments we’ve never seen these animals in.”

J.A. Bayona’s Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom ended with a number of shots showing the dinosaurs reaching cities and locations in and around California, and with the technology used to create these dinosaurs now out in the open world and potentially in the hands of large corporations that don’t have the animals best interests in mind, Jurassic World 3 could show us a much darker side to this story.

We want to say a huge thank you to Colin Trevorrow for this interview and for speaking with us! We hope you enjoyed the read and in case you missed our previous interview with the director back in 2016 you can find that here or listen to the podcast. There’s a surprise guest at the end. And that surprise guest is J.A. Bayona. Sorry to ruin the surprise. But it has been over two years since that interview, so that’s on you.

And be sure to take a listen to our brand new episode where we discuss this interview and go into detail on some of Colin’s answers:

Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for more Jurassic content!

‘Jurassic World 3’ or ‘Jurassic Park 6’? Colin Trevorrow Shares Photo with Writing Partner Emily Carmichael

One of this Summer’s largest blockbusters Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom has now released on digital and DVD/Blu-Ray, and with the Box Office numbers currently making it the fourth highest grossing movie domestically this year, it’s no surprise that the third movie in the Jurassic World trilogy is already in the works.

Set for release on June 11 2021, Jurassic World 3 is being penned by Colin Trevorrow and newcomer Emily Carmichael, who is best known for her work on Pacific Rim: Uprising.

Today Colin shared a photo of Emily and himself in France, where they met to discuss the sequel’s story.


While the photo’s intention is not to reveal anything about the story, what’s interesting is that Colin referred to the movie as Jurassic Park 6.

The Jurassic World trilogy stands as a reboot of a once popular franchise and successfully brought it back into mainstream culture. Reboot by definition does not mean remake, and the films continue on the same timeline established in the original trilogy. Dr. Henry Wu and Dr. Ian Malcolm are two characters from the original trilogy that have returned in the new movies, and this small nod by Colin could mean that we will see an even deeper connection to the original Jurassic Park in Emily and Colin’s story.

Not to mention the numerous hints being given by various cast members, it seems likely that paleobotanist Dr. Ellie Sattler may return. But of course, that’s just speculation.

“You can’t put it back in the box!” The ending of Fallen Kingdom sees dinosaurs now spread across the world, owned by various parties and being used for a varying number of tasks. And as Mill’s put it, there is no going back – not just with the animals, but the technology to make new ones.

What’s in store for Jurassic Park 6? There is a world of possibilities for where Emily and Colin could take the story, but one thing’s for sure: this will be the closing film in the current trilogy.

For more from Emily Carmichael, be sure to give her short film Stryka a watch, which she wrote and directed.

Where do you hope they take Jurassic World 3? Are you happy that we may be leaving the islands for good? Let us know your hopes for the sequel in the comments section below!

Devin and Chelsea Break ‘Jurassic Park: The Ride’ Record Before it Closes for Good

In a heartwarming video, two Jurassic Park fans spend their day riding Jurassic Park: The Ride at Universal Studios Hollywood before it closes for good.

But that’s not all. After breaking the record and completing 61 journeys through Jurassic Park, battling spitting Dilophosaurs and facing an angry T. rex, Devin got on his knees and proposed.

In a sneaky Dennis Nedry fashion, Devin hid the ring within a Barbasol cannister alongside DNA from species across the original park. How cool is that?

The couple who reside in LA have annual passes to the Hollywood park and have made it a tradition to ride the Jurassic Park ride every year on Chelsea’s birthday. The previous record was 60 rides in a day, and the pair rode it a total of 62 times. Along with the proposal, I don’t think this is a day they’ll soon forget!

Did you catch a look at the engagement ring? It was custom made and features mosquito amber. Spared no expense. The Barbasol cannister was a prototype by Chronicle Collectibles who will be releasing it in the near future.

Today marks the final day for Jurassic Park: The Ride. Opened on June 21, 1996, the ride has been a fan favourite since then and remains as one of the only rides left at the park without projections or 3D screens.

While it is a sad day, a new Jurassic World themed ride will take it’s place at the park in 2019 – and hopefully will feature a small glimpse at the original park. The river boat ride is to remain open at the Universal Studios Orlando park, and there are rumours that park will see an expansion within the Jurassic Park area.

Join us in congratulating Chelsea and Devin – what a wonderful way to propose and celebrate your engagement!

Will you miss the ride? Let us know in the comments section below what you hope to see in Jurassic World: The Ride!

‘Jurassic Park Danger!’ Board Game Releases TODAY in the UK!

A few months ago board game lovers were able to visit Isla Nublar with the release of the board game, Jurassic Park: Danger!

A fun role-playing board game features dinosaurs and characters from the original movie who were set against each other in a race for survival. The game is a lot of fun, and we worked with the designers at Ravensburger on a live play-through of the game at the Jurassic Park 25th Anniversary event, which we live streamed.

Unfortunately for some the game itself wasn’t available for purchase outside of the United States. We joined up with the designers again to run a competition for fans in the US and UK to win a copy of the game, with the hope that some fans who have been waiting for the game would get to play it!

Well now, after a long wait, the game is releasing in the UK on 3rd September! With listings already available on Amazon and John Lewis, the board game will retail at £24.99.

Will you be grabbing a copy of Jurassic Park: Danger!? Let us know in the comments section below how you survive the harsh jungles of Cloud Island…

Chronicle Collectibles Debut 1/4 Scale Dr. Alan Grant ‘Jurassic Park’ Statue!

Ever since acquiring the license for the Jurassic Park franchise, our friends at Chronicle Collectibles have been surprising fans with scale model replicas of our favourite dinosaurs from the movies, along with a handful of more unique pieces.

A while back they teased a 1/4 scale statue of Dr. Grant himself, and while news has been slow, the company are excited to announce their very first statue of a human character from Jurassic Park!

Modeled from the T. rex breakout scene, the statue features Dr. Grant staring down the escaped T. rex as it attacks Lex and Tim.

And yes, the flare really lights up! Creative director and co-founder of Chronicle Collectibles Paul Francis shared his enthusiasm for the piece:

“Fans have been clamoring for a 1/4 scale human character from Jurassic Park, so we’re starting with Dr. Grant. Picking the key scene of Dr. Grant facing down the T. Rex seemed like the perfect representation to start with. We hope to do more human character statues from Jurassic Park in the future.”

As with every Chronicle piece this will be run for a limited time. It’s roughly 22.5″ tall and the base is 13″ in diameter. And what a beautiful base that is!

Dr. Alan Grant can be pre-ordered now on their website for $599.99, although there are also a number of payment plans available!

Will you be picking up Dr. Grant? What other items from Chronicle are you a fan of? Let’s get the discussion going below!

Drop Dead Drops Exclusive ‘Jurassic Park’ Clothing Collection

UK based clothing company Drop Dead has just launched the Capsule Collection, a unique clothing line to celebrate both the release of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom and the 25th anniversary of the movie that started it all – Jurassic Park.

Working in partnership with Universal Brand Development, Drop Dead noticeably chose a vintage, Classic Jurassic style for the line, remaining inline with the early 90s aesthetic seen in Jurassic Park.

This iconic line features bomber jackets, shirts, bags sporting nostalgia-inducing graphics including dinosaurs, maps of Isla Nublar, and writing reminiscent of the text seen on Nedry’s computer. And speaking of Dennis Nedry, a Nedry themed buttoned shirt and shorts can also be found in this collection.

The clothing company was founded by Oliver Sykes (lead singer of Bring Me the Horizon) who is a huge fan of the original movie. When discussing this collection, he said:

“Jurassic Park has been my favorite film of all time since I saw it in 1993. I was always into dinosaurs as a kid, but Jurassic Park truly sent me into obsession. To be able to do a collaboration with the franchise has been a lifelong goal and dream. After producing many designs influenced by Jurassic Park for Drop Dead, being able to use the actual material for the real has been amazing and I couldn’t be more stoked on what we’ve produced.”

Isla Nublar was Site A. Isla Sorna was Site B. Drop Dead’s laboratory is Site D, and that’s where all of these products – or specimens – were created.

The overgrown foliage, chemical jars and decontamination zone theme can be found in Drop Dead Clothing’s London store, seen in the promotional video above. Their Sheffield store also followed suit and re-opened with a design refresh and a brand new vegan restaurant, a bar and a store.

The collection is a wonderful addition to Jurassic Park’s return to popular culture and features inspired designs reflecting the designer’s love for the 1993 film. The items look like they came straight out of the 1990’s!

‘DDxJP’ is available now at Drop Dead stores and through their official website.

What do you think about this clothing collection? Let us know in the comments section below!

New Fan Film ‘Jurassic World: Exodus’ Takes Us Back to Nublar Before Fallen Kingdom

The Jurassic Park Motorpool are back with a brand new fan film! Army veteran and fan film producer Gregory Wong presents Jurassic World: Exodus, a fan film following the story of a Special Forces recovery team sent to Isla Nublar to extract a missing soldier and Seismologist.

The film is a collaboration of many fans from across the world and was filmed on location on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Turn the sound up:

The team behind Exodus are no strangers to the fan film world, having released Jurassic World: Asset Containment Unit back in 2015 just before Jurassic World hit theaters. Three years on and Greg has brought us a new fan film to indulge our cravings with.

While fan films are usually kept within the ‘zero budget’ category, that’s not to say the effort put in doesn’t pay off. Jurassic World: Exodus was filmed on location in Hawaii, using locations seen before in Lost and the Jurassic series. The beautiful jungles of Oahu, mixed with Motorpool Jeeps, a wealth of weaponary and legitimate US Army props, gear and uniforms, this military based fan film shows no signs of restraint when it comes to scale.

Many of the prop firearms and uniforms were donated by companies like Evike and JKarmy, but the film’s leading star – a full size Velociraptor animatronic head – was created by Marco Cavassa. The Visual Effects were a collaboration between Kerr Robinson and Joe losczack.

The cast and crew were mostly made up of U.S. veterans, including Marines Travis Haley, Sean Jennings and Robert Bryce, Army veterans Bryon Beisek and Greg Wong, Navy Corpsman Nic Cornett (who directed the film) and Air Force veterans Mike Jones and Shannon Corbeil.

The Jurassic Park Jeeps were provided by Oahu residents Sidney and Jacob, who I was lucky enough to meet last year, and they add a huge amount of nostalgia and credibility to any Jurassic project. There are literally hundreds of replica Jurassic Park Jeeps across the world, all part of the Motorpool.

The scale of the movie really is something to adore.

We had a lot of fun watching Jurassic World: Exodus and hope you do too! A huge congratulations is due to Greg, Nic, and the entire team for bringing this fan project together and delivering an exciting 25 minutes of Jurassic fun.

Be sure to check out the full movie here, and some behind the scenes from both fan films across Greg’s channel.

A 25 Foot Ian Malcolm ‘Jurassic Park’ Statue Has Taken Over London

The Jurassic Park franchise has been celebrating hard this year. With the release of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom dominating the Summer box office, 2017 also marks 25 years since the original movie captivated audiences, with fans being treated to a three day celebration at Universal Studios Hollywood.

But topping all of that is this 25 foot statue of Jeff Goldblum, which was erected on the banks of the River Thames in London just this morning.

Sitting just in front of Tower Bridge, the statue was commissioned by Now TV – who wanted to celebrate Jurassic Park in their own unique, yet sexy way.

Featuring Dr. Ian Malcolm’s all-black clothing complete with unbuttoned shirt, the statue replicates the character’s iconic pose during the third act of the movie.

Fans living in or visiting London will have the chance to see this statue up close until July 26, where it will then no doubt become part of Jurassic World: The Exhibition.

Be sure to share your photos with us if you’re lucky enough to see #JurassicJeff!