OPINION: Robert Muldoon’s Undeserved Death

The socks. The hat. The accent. What did Robert Muldoon have in Jurassic Park that you don’t recall immediately? The game warden from Kenya was a man of high intellect. He had seen raptors at their most curious stages (for example, testing the electric fences for weaknesses), and I’m sure at their most admirable stages as well. He was taken out of the franchise too soon, and although I’m honestly not sure where else he would have fit in down the road, I think the possibility to see him again could have been there.

What Steven Spielberg did with Bob Peck’s outstanding character is genius. Sadly, on April 4th this year, it will have been 19 years since Bob Peck passed away from cancer. To honor his memory, let’s briefly discuss the stellar job he did with this character and why Robert Muldoon is a JP legend.

A common theme throughout most of the JP franchise is that good guys live and bad ones meet their ultimate demise. In fact, sometimes you don’t have to be a “bad guy” to seal your fate in this series — all you need is a lack of respect for the power of dinosaurs. If you see them as assets or look at them with dollar signs (I’m thinking of you, toilet boy), then you’re most likely as good as dead. Nedry, Genaro, Ludlow, Hoskins, Dieter Stark (with a particularly brutal and prolonged death); all met ends that seemed to make sense. They all had agendas that looked past the fact that these were big, powerful and living animals that deserved to be treated with more respect. One of them in particular, Dieter Stark, had a well-deserved death — death by what seemed to be a thousand compys eating him alive for zapping one of their own with a taser for no reason.

Other deaths came as a slight surprise. The character wasn’t money hungry, he or she didn’t not respect the animals. They were simply expendable, I guess. Think of Eddie Carr, Udesky and Zara. Eddie went out a hero, trying to save his new friends. I find his death to be one of the more depressing endings of a character in the JP universe. Udesky was just trying to help find a child. The worst thing Zara did was not pay better attention to her boss’ nephews. There are more of these types of deaths out there, but those are the ones that come to my mind first.

One of the reasons that Jurassic Park got this franchise started on such a powerful note is because some things happened that you never saw coming, including the death of Muldoon. You may have guessed that Genaro would die — but by being plucked off the toilet? Not many could have guessed that, I’m sure. When Nedry met his end (which I still find to be a particularly disturbing scene, bravo Mr. Spielberg), I knew it had to be done. He had caused so much destruction and loss of life due to his greed. But when he got back in his Jeep, I thought he had bought himself just a little more time. I was wrong. And who could have predicted Ray Arnold’s arm giving Ellie the surprise of her life?

And then there’s Muldoon. Muldoon had so much respect for these animals. It gives me shivers when he is crouching past the raptor enclosure with Ellie and he sees that they’ve escaped. The terror in his eyes and voice is unforgettable. Never once did we ever get the slightest hint that he cared about money. He didn’t want to see harm inflicted on a single person. He was genuinely angry that locking mechanisms had not yet been put on the vehicle doors, as an example of that. In the end, he gave his life to save Ellie’s and ultimately, the rest of the survivors. I still even find myself wondering if he was serious or sarcastic when he told the main group, “they should all be destroyed,” referring to the raptors. He watched Jophery die. He knew what these creatures were capable of and didn’t deserve what he was given.

With Muldoon, Spielberg had to make his audience understand that in this universe no one was truly safe. Respectful or not, these animals were vicious, cutthroat and your attitude towards them meant nothing in the end. The way he died was perfectly executed; he went out in a legendary way. The comfort that JP fans can take in his death is that he looked his predator in the eyes. He even got to acknowledge her intelligence and her hunting ability. In essence, when he gave us his last line, “clever girl,” he was basically saying, “Well done girl, you got me. Respect.” After that point, it’s best to not listen, because the JP legend goes down in a horrifying and undeserved way.

Jurassic Park is a fierce franchise with even more to come. Henry Wu is going to have a grisly end, you can bet on that. The theme of the first movie carries over through every installment of the series. That theme is that just because you made them, doesn’t mean these living creatures are mindless assets. Mills, Wheaton and others in Fallen Kingdom, like Hoskins, don’t get that. It’s probably a safe bet that they won’t make it out either. As Owen once said, “They’re alive. They’re thinkin’.. I gotta eat. I gotta hunt,” and, well, you know the rest.

What do you think? Do you think of Muldoon as a legendary JP character? Let us know your thoughts below!

If you’d like to discuss any and all thing JP with me, follow me on Twitter!

Mattel Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom Thrash N Throw T Rex Video Review!

Mattel have spared no expense.

That is the resounding impression I have been left with after going hands on with their Jurassic World line at New York Toy Fair, and now with my very own here at home. I knew the toys were good when I saw them on display – but could they really stand on their own, were the paint applications really that good – you never know until you have the final item.

As it turns out, there was no smoke and mirrors. The toys have continued to impress with their outstanding quality, and innovative and fun play features. The new Thrash N Throw Tyrannosaurus Rex perhaps is the most innovative of the bunch, taking the typical large biting Rex toy and throwing in a new range of motion for exciting, and lifelike movement.

Check out the video review below, and read on for more specific impressions.

About the toy:

Relive the Big Screen Action-Adventure! Get ready for thrilling action and adventure with Jurassic World! Relive captivating movie moments and exciting scenes with this line of film-inspired products featuring authentic detail, amazing design and incredible value fans will love!

Authentic Sculpting & Decoration
In the style of the fan-favorite character from the original Jurassic Park, Thrash ‘N Throw Tyrannosaurus Rex™ is back and better than ever with exciting action features, authentic sculpting and decoration.

Chomping & Stomping Sound Effects
In addition to authentic sculpt and decoration, Thrash ‘N Throw Tyrannosaurus Rex™ has sound effect features like chomping and stomping, an impressive roar and a HUGE bite.

Thrash & Throw Tail Activation
Thrash ‘N Throw Tyrannosaurus Rex™ can use her tail activation to open her mouth and pick up other human and dinosaur action figures, and then thrash and throw them across the room just like epic dinosaur action scenes from the movie!

Ages 3+
SRP $39.99
Releases April 16th, 2018

The Thrash N Throw Tyrannosaurus Rex measures about 21 inches long, stands on its own, and can roar, bite, stomp, and thrash its head with a total of 7 sounds. You can control the motions by moving its tail up and down, as well as left and right, which translates to the inverse motion on the head. The more you play, the more you can find ways to fine tune her movements, which can be surprisingly lifelike.

With the biting feature, you can have the T. rex lunge downward, biting and picking up other dinosaurs or humans that sit below her – from there you can thrash her body and head back and forth, until throwing the dino-food, much like the scenes in the Jurassic Park films.

The toy is large and detailed, with the most film accurate sculpt the series has seen! Not only does she have the bumps and scales she’s famous for, she has her scars from the end battles of Jurassic Park and World, easily making the toy a must for kids and collectors.

A fun new feature of this toy line is the Jurassic Facts App – each dino has a DNA strand QR code on their foot, which unlocks them within the app. As of the time of filming this review, the app was not yet available, however it has since launched on IOS. Check out our article here!

Also check out our reviews for the Action Attack Carnotaurus and Stegosaurus, plus a wide range of the Mattel Jurassic World toys from our Toy Fair 2018 gallery on Facebook here!

Video Review: Mattel Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom Action Attack Stegosaurus!

Hot off the heels of our Action Attack Carnotaurus review, we have the striking Stegosaurus from Mattel!

It’s no secret the 2015 Jurassic World toys from Hasbro weren’t what fans were looking for, with a genuine lapse of quality that effected play factor for kids. Thankfully Mattel heard the comments of fans and parents alike, and answered with a toy line that has eclipsed our admittedly tough expectations.

Innovative features, competitive pricing, and fantastic quality have brought the dinosaurs to life with an incredibly diverse array of play patterns with an attention to details fans are sure to love.

Check out the video review of the Action Attack Stegosaurus review below!

About this toy:

Relive the Big Screen Action-Adventure! Get ready for thrilling action and adventure with Jurassic World! Relive captivating movie moments and exciting scenes with this line of film-inspired products featuring authentic detail, amazing design and incredible value fans will love!

Authentic Sculpting & Decoration
Jurassic World Action Attack™ dinosaur figures feature realistic sculpting and authentic decoration that make these dinosaurs come to life ready for attack action!

Action Attack Features!
Get ready for the ultimate movie action with Action Attack™ Carnotaurus (press a button to make the head strike forward and jaws chomp) and Action Attack™ Stegosaurus (press a spine plate to trigger the tail swipe). It’s dinosaur attack moves and Jurassic World movie action in one!

Ages 4+
SRP $19.99
Available April 16th, 2018

The Mattel Jurassic World toys are made to properly size with one another, using the 3.75″ human action figures as the base scale – the Tyrannosaurs are appropriately large, towering over the smaller species like Dilophosaurus. The Stegosaurus is a large toy, measuring about 15 inches long, and features numerous points of articulation and a button activated tail swinging mechanism. As part of the Action Attack SKU, it is available alongside the Carnotaurus with a Suchomimus coming later this year.

While the toy is painted differently than the Stegosaurus of the film, the color and paint application used is quite aesthetically pleasing, and the sculpt is certainly accurate. The sculpt has lots of detail, and is quite sizey, making it easy and fun to play with, or great looking to display on a desk or shelf. The Action Attack feature is fun, and simply requires a firm press down on the rear plate for a fluid swinging motion.

As Mattel continues to roll out new toys, this Stegosaurus will remain much sought after, as for the time being, it’s the largest herbivore they’re offering. However, there are plenty of medium-large herbivores coming, in the form of the Roarivores Triceratops, Ankylosaurus, and Pachyrhinosaurus.

Check out a wide range of the Mattel Jurassic World toys, including the Action Attack Suchomimus, from our Toy Fair 2018 gallery on Facebook here!

A fun new feature of this toy line is the Jurassic Facts App – each dino has a DNA strand QR code on their foot, which unlocks them within the app. As of the time of this review, the app was not yet available, but we will cover it once it goes online! Stay tuned- we have more reviews of the Mattel toys coming soon, including the incredibly fun Thrash N’ Throw Tyrannosaurus Rex!

Claire Dearing is Unrepentant in New Dinosaur Protection Group Updates

When Jurassic World released, the online discussion was mired with debate and controversy – sometimes forced, othertimes earned.

One of the talking points that stuck (other than high heels and Zara’s death) was Clarie Dearing’s (played by Bryce Dallas Howard) ownership of blame for the Jurassic World incident, which led to many civilian, staff, dinosaur, and private military deaths. As the parks Operations Manager, audiences questioned why the movie didn’t end with her being jailed – an argument that at the time I felt was weak, with no real gravitas.

The movie goes out of its way to show that InGen and Simon Masrani were running the show when it came to genetic research plus security controls, and that many less than savory characters were able to back channel their own projects due to Masrani’s eccentric aloofness. Claire’s responsibilities essentially fell into making their workings flow as an entertaining resort for guests and a profitable endeavor for their shareholders. Yes, she was part of the discussions that led to the Indominus Rex, and therefore owns some of the blame of the events that followed – however, she was second fiddle to many higher on the chain of command, and was not a Hammond like entrepreneur and owner.

So when people often called for to be jailed, I found myself going to bat for her character. It seemed most people arguing for her to be behind bars simply didn’t like her as a character, and were using this as an excuse to write her off. I don’t love Owen or Claire, as I felt both played out like comic book heroes, rather than real world people – but I don’t hate them, and feel that there is a story to be told from both players, with Claire offering more humanity than people gave credit.

So why is it that with every Dinosaur Protection Group update, I’m becoming less and less a fan of Claire’s?

In a new happy go lucky video from the DPG, Claire Dearing calls for your support in saving the dinosaurs. Much like the website of the advocacy group, it focuses on a friendly vibe, and pulls on the heartstrings of viewers of their nostalgic dinosaur encounters. While this is reflective of many forms of grassroots activism, it seems to sidestep many pertinent controversies and conflicts, burying them beneath a few layers of friendly gloss.

In the video above, Claire doesn’t remind viewers of the role she played in exploiting these animals herself – something I am readily able to forgive, should she take more ownership. In fact, the entire website paints the DPG as a naive organization, not ready to fully discuss the impact and implications resurrected prehistoric life has on the greater ecosystem. I suppose what really irks me, is that Claire and the DPG seem more interested in preserving the experience of the world being able to enjoy dinosaurs, rather than their value as a lifeform damned by mankinds actions.

The imminent eruption of Mount Sibo appears to be a convenient rallying call, but not the the core ethical dilemma driving the seemingly well meaning, but out of touch organization.

The inability to truly accept responsibility, nor deal with the greater implications and impact her past has had on animal rights was double downed upon with today’s update. In a faux newspaper article titled ‘OPINION: DINOSAUR RIGHTS – BIRTH OF AN ACTIVIST’, the foundation is set upon where the film will pick up. The debate on whether the dinosaurs of Isla Nublar have rights or if their corporate property rages on, and many are pointing fingers.

Perhaps most surprings is that Claire isn’t owning up to her role in the events that came before as way to earn authority over the talking points being presented, but rather shifts blame to Dr. Henry Wu only, painting him as a seedy villain for the press to focus upon. Perhaps Dr. Wu is a villain, or perhaps his role in the events of the past and future are more nuanced – while he certainly has a lot to answer for, Claire pushing that argument so strongly only acts to delegitmize any claim she attempts to showcase that she accepts any responsibility, and has grown as a person because of it.

As a viewer, I want to support the DPG. I want to feel that the organization is able to tackle the larger elements at play, and offer an actual intellectual argument for their cause. Animal rights are important, even within fiction, and the theme behind this film offers a nuanced ethical dilemma playing as the backdrop of the dino carnage that no doubt will play out. However, at this point, it seems the DPG are not prepared for the endeavor they’ve put themselves at forefront of – and perhaps that is an element within the film.

Will the DPG’s well meaning, but ill approached antics be exploited and lead to the death of more people, and the mistreatment of even more prehistoric fauna? It seems likely. I just hope Claire accepts more blame than the website currently implies, as her likability of a character, and believability of growth depends on it.

“Some of the worst things imaginable have been done with the best intentions.” – Dr. Alan Grant

There is a line in the sand between clear actions of good and evil, but most real world events and individuals never come close to a definitive side, operating unknowingly in a blurred grey area. What makes Jurassic Park so special is its focus and embrace of that concept. As of now, it seems the DPG is attempting to paint Claire as purely good, and Dr. Wu as a malicious counterweight – something that doesn’t sit right with me as a fan of films, nor do I feel the onscreen evidence entirely supports this.

Perhaps I’m asking for more nuance – or perhaps we’re given a peek into the DPG’s bias and Claire’s personality, who still has room to learn and grow. All will be answered this June with the release of Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom.

Agree – disagree – debate and share your thoughts in the comments below, and as always stay tuned for the latest news!

Source: Dinosaur Protection Group

Video Review: Mattel Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom Action Attack Carnotaurus!

Jurassic Park has a new definitive Carnotaurus toy.

Ahead of their release, we were lucky to get a hold of some of the upcoming new Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom toys from Mattel! Fans have eagerly anticipated this toy line, as it’s Mattel’s first foray into Jurassic Park, after winning the license from Hasbro (who had it since 1993 via Kenner).

After the disappointing 2015 toys by Hasbro, there was nowhere to go but up. Thankfully, Mattel didn’t settle for average and have exceeded expectations, delivering a fantastic toy line for kids and collectors, with innovative play features, competitive pricing, and fantastic quality. These toys have brought the dinosaurs to life with an incredibly fun array of play patterns with an attention to details fans are sure to love.

Check out this video review of the Action Attack Carnotaurus, where we start with an unboxing and go over it in detail, comparing it to some classic Jurassic toys for size and quality reference.

About this toy:

Relive the Big Screen Action-Adventure! Get ready for thrilling action and adventure with Jurassic World! Relive captivating movie moments and exciting scenes with this line of film-inspired products featuring authentic detail, amazing design and incredible value fans will love!

Authentic Sculpting & Decoration
Jurassic World Action Attack™ dinosaur figures feature realistic sculpting and authentic decoration that make these dinosaurs come to life ready for attack action!

Action Attack Features!
Get ready for the ultimate movie action with Action Attack™ Carnotaurus (press a button to make the head strike forward and jaws chomp) and Action Attack™ Stegosaurus (press a spine plate to trigger the tail swipe). It’s dinosaur attack moves and Jurassic World movie action in one!

Ages 4+
SRP $19.99
Available April 16th, 2018

The Mattel Jurassic World toys are made to properly size with one another, using the 3.75″ human action figures as the base scale – the Tyrannosaurs are appropriately large, towering over the smaller species like Dilophosaurus. The Carnotaurus is a large toy, measuring about 15 inches long, and features numerous points of articulation and a button activated biting mechanism. As part of the Action Attack SKU, it is available alongside the Stegosaurus with a Suchomimus coming later this year.

Check out a wide range of the Mattel Jurassic World toys, including the Action Attack Suchomimus, from our Toy Fair 2018 gallery on Facebook here!

A fun new feature of this toy line is the Jurassic Facts App – each dino has a DNA strand QR code on their foot, which unlocks them within the app. As of the time of this review, the app was not yet available, but we will cover it once it goes online! Stay tuned- we have more reviews of the Mattel toys coming soon, including the Action Attack Stegosaurus and incredibly fun Thrash N’ Throw Tyrannosaurus Rex!

What Mattel Jurassic World toy are you most looking forward to? Sound off in the comments below!

Opinion: Jurassic Park 3’s Importance to the Franchise

I was eight years old when Jurassic Park III was released.

I can vividly remember jumping in the car with my mom and dad and heading to the theater. It was hard to believe they had made a 3rd movie. Dinosaurs and the Jurassic franchise were my thing. My sister had Disney princesses, my brother had NASCAR —I had dinosaurs. I loved JP 3. I still do. For a long time after the movie’s release, it was by far my favorite of the three in the franchise. I can remember opening a huge (but very light) box on Christmas morning in 2001 to find that silver VHS. I couldn’t have been happier.

Over the years I began to love each of the three films equally, because I love the individual personalities that they bring to the screen. Jurassic Park brings wonder and awe of these amazing animals. The Lost World brings a feeling of wilderness and safari while exploring the dinosaur universe. Then Jurassic Park III came along and delivered a type of big-action, jungle vibe that was altogether different from the first two. I’m not saying that any of these three films are perfect. There are flaws in them as there are in every movie. However, they are darn good and entertaining. The question still stands — was Jurassic Park III a good stand-alone movie and solid addition to this franchise at the time? Maybe not. What is awesome, however, is that with the addition of a new trilogy and backstory, fans may want to take another look at it and its newfound place in the Jurassic universe.

Once I became more in touch with the internet as I got older, I realized something that both surprised and bothered me. There was some serious hate (and still is) being thrown JP 3’s way. I couldn’t believe it and had no idea why. Once I dug further, I realized it came from two main sources — Spinosaurs killing a T-rex (not even our beloved Rexy,) and the Kirbys.

The fight between the Spinosaurus and T-rex is something that will live in Jurassic infamy for fans. At that point in paleontology, Spino was considered the biggest and most ferocious animal to walk the Earth. I don’t think everyone properly understood at the time, but the T-rex in JP 3 is young. This information comes from the Wiki information of the Jurassic franchise, as well as the dinosaur size charts for the films. This rex was more than likely an inexperienced fighter as well. This fight could have absolutely been handled better by the screenwriters. But to hate the movie over a fight? That doesn’t make sense to me.

Dr. Grant said that Spinosaurus “wasn’t on InGen’s list,” and it made him wonder what else they were up to. Flash forward 14 years to Jurassic World — we can now venture a guess as to what InGen may have been dabbling in at that time. When Grant said that in JP 3, no one had any idea that the franchise was going to carry on, and the movie ended with hardly any other mention of InGen. We now know the origin of Spinosaurus, thanks to the Dinosaur Protection Group (DPG). Spino was one of several secret experiments by InGen, which began after Masrani acquired them in the late 90’s. DPG gave extra meaning to JP 3 by explaining where its main antagonist came from. No longer do we need to be confused as to why this beast seemingly fell from the sky.

Dr. Grant also gives a chilling warning in JP3 that now seems to foreshadow Jurassic World. He tells Billy “some of the worst things imaginable have been done with the best intentions.” In Jurassic World, Vic Hoskins makes me believe that he has good intentions, even though his end game is more than likely making big money from his Indoraptor idea. In the end he loses his life, but before that, a large part of his concern is saving the lives of soldiers via militarized raptors. Grant’s words can really resonate with you when you see clips of the Indominus and Indoraptor wreaking havoc. In fact, I would get chills if they inserted his quote into the Fallen Kingdom trailer.

If the new Jurassic World trilogy did not exist now, would you care whatsoever about what InGen was up to back in the early 2000’s? Or care to wonder where Spinosaurus came from? Most likely not. If you look back at the movie now and listen to the confusion in Grant’s voice, it’s interesting to think (and now know) what Masrani’s acquired InGen team was working on somewhere in the world.

Jurassic fans should be happy with how much raptor intelligence was explored in the third film. We learned about their communication, their ability to set traps and their fierce loyalty to keeping their young in their possession. Jurassic Park let us know the preliminary information on these animals, but JP 3 really dove in. For this reason, it allowed me to be able to buy into the fact that they can be trained. Raptors are supposed to be brilliantly smart creatures. If dolphins, gorillas and whales can be trained, why couldn’t raptors? This is especially true when they come in contact with their alpha from birth, just like Owen. I totally bought into the idea that raptors could be trained, and a large part of that reason was because of how smart they were portrayed to be in JP 3.

In the movie, the Kirbys may have been slightly annoying, but at the end of the day they’re supposed to be parents scared to death that their son is dead. Amanda also did something that had a roundabout effect on what is going on in the Jurassic universe today. When escaping from the Pteranodon enclosure, she doesn’t take the time to fully shut the door. This allows the Pteranodons to escape their cage and flee from the island. It is now a known fact that those Pteranodons ended up in Canada. Who was tasked with the job of corralling them up? Vic Hoskins. And because of the excellent job and manner in which he presented his team in Canada, he was hired by Simon Masrani. A few years later, with his job at InGen, Hoskins would be plotting with Henry Wu to make an ultimate weapon of war — the Indoraptor.

It’s my theory that Hoskins and Wu worked to come up with something like the Indominus. They made it. They wanted it to escape. And when it did, Hoskins knew that he could exploit Owen’s raptors’ intelligence and tracking ability to hunt it. Then after their success, he could really push the idea of a shrunken Indominus without the T-rex DNA to use for war.

So now go back to Amanda running from the Pteranodon enclosure. If she stops to shut that door properly, does any of this ever take place? I think that’s a fair question. Would there be hybrid dinosaurs? Probably. In the late 1990’s, Wu was successfully creating hybrid plants. I think it would have only been a matter of time before he went to hybrid dinosaurs. However, would he have been corrupted in the way he was after Hoskins got to him? Hard to say for certain.

Is Jurassic Park III perfect? No. But, I find it highly entertaining, with great-looking dinos and fantastic graphics. Standing as a third and potentially final installment of the franchise, I would say this movie is lackluster. However, being the middle piece of the puzzle that fills in some gaps gives it meaning and value. When you watch this movie today, you can relate it to the future of the Jurassic franchise much better than you could have for the last 17 years. Today, its dialogue and premise makes sense and should be appreciated more for what it is.

What are your thoughts on what Jurassic Park 3 adds to the franchise? Sound off in the comments below!

Opinion: Who Should Direct Jurassic World 3?

It’s official: we now have a release date for the third film in the Jurassic World franchise! Set to be released on June 11, 2021, this third film has fans everywhere excited. However, the announcement of a third film begs one very large, very important question:

Who’s going to direct it?

Who can bring about those classic Jurassic Park sensibilities and inject those intense elements that fans love so dearly, while still putting their own mark on the film? By no means is directing a franchise of such a large caliber an easy job, but there are many directors out there who have proved that they are more than capable of reining in a few wayward dinos (and a few more wayward actors).

But, it takes something special to create a truly unique film that appeals to everybody, and with the clear sign that diverse movies sell well, it’s high time that the directors and stars of a franchise as big as Jurassic World change to reflect the vast fanbase.

So, we present (in no particular order), a list of five diverse, talented people I believe would serve the Jurassic franchise well:

(Source: IMDb)

Ava DuVernay

Arguably the biggest name on this list, DuVernay is one of the spearheads of a new era of Hollywood blockbusters: those that are diverse, and tell diverse stories. And that’s exactly what the Jurassic franchise needs. While we’ve always had women at the forefronts of these tales, and they’re certainly not just there to look pretty, bringing someone like DuVernay in could open up endless opportunities to put people of color in the spotlight in one of the biggest film franchises in history. From the success of films like Black Panther, it’s clear that diverse films sell, and it feels like it’s time for the Jurassic franchise to catch up.

Projects like Selma prove that DuVernay has the determination and the intense ardor needed to create a great film, as well as tell a story that it is far more than what it seems to be on the surface. DuVernay is devoted to creating a n entire experience within her films – an admirable quality that gives her a seat at the table of Hollywood’s best contemporary directors.

And of course, the director’s previous work shows excellent examples of the whimsy and nostalgia that everyone feels when they watch (or rewatch) the original Jurassic Park – just look at what we’re expecting to see from A Wrinkle in Time. DuVernay tells very human stories while balancing it with the magic we all want to feel, and could bring something totally different to Jurassic World 3 that would change the game entirely.

(Source: IMDb)

Karyn Kusama

Having won awards from both the Cannes and Sundance Film Festivals for her films, Karyn Kusama certainly has the experience necessary to helm a Jurassic film with the poise and determination it takes to make a great film.

Her work on the horror-comedy Jennifer’s Body is highly underrated, and like DuVernay, Kusama is a woman of color who could bring a much-needed lens of diversity to the film. (When making her debut, Girlfight, she insisted that the protagonist be Latina rather than whitewashed to become a white actress’ star vehicle.) And, in addition to that, Kusama’s roots in horror with works like Jennifer’s Body and The Invitation can lend an unsettling quality to the Jurassic films – one that could bring the grit back around that Crichton’s original novels offer so effectively.

Kusama’s work with female-centric works like Girlfight, her breakout film, and the all-female horror anthology XX, also indicate a perspective that the Jurassic franchise could use. The idea of strong, independent, Sexy Lamp Test-passing females has been a staple of the films for the past twenty-five years, but we could always use more. Third film’s the charm, right?

(Source: IMDb)

Ana Lily Amirpour

Amirpour is perhaps best known for her 2014 vampire drama, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, as well as 2016’s The Bad Batch, a post-apocalyptic story featuring Keanu Reeves, Jason Momoa, and a one-armed Suki Waterhouse. She’s straight and to-the-point with her storytelling – there’s no creatively masking violence or insecurity, and the directness helps to build the brave new worlds her characters exist in and interact with.

Her work is delightfully bizarre, but also carries with it a heavy sense of sharpness and honesty that few other filmmakers can display in such intense genre films. She tells compelling stories using the bare minimum amount elements, and it’s clear that she knows exactly what she’s trying to achieve with each new project.

Amirpour only has two feature-length credits to her name – plus a directing credit on an upcoming episode of Legion – but other franchises have had clear success pulling directors from small, indie film backgrounds (see: Taika Waititi’s successful turn directing Thor: Ragnarok) and Amirpour’s style is perhaps exactly what the franchise needs. A bit strange, more than a bit dramatic, and pointedly different.

(Source: IMDb)

Sarah Adina Smith

Sarah Adina Smith is a woman known for her off-the-wall takes on the human psyche and the human experience. These tales have won several awards, including multiple Best Film awards for 2014’s The Midnight Swim, the story of three women unable to let go of the death of their mother. Off-the-wall is precisely what the Jurassic films need to continue pushing the envelope of the sci-fi genre, so why not put Smith in the driver’s seat?

Like Amirpour, Smith is also directing an upcoming episode of Legion, suggesting her propensity for stretching the limits of audiences’ imaginations to create an unbelievable world of sci-fi and fantasy – much like Michael Crichton did when he originally published Jurassic Park.

The indie director says that her approach to film is not intentionally unconventional – in an interview with Daily Dead, she said that “it’s all about listening and seeing what [the] movie wants to be, and letting the movie have a life of its own, and letting it dictate where it wants to go, and being less controlling about the process”. What would happen if she were made head of a large film like Jurassic World 3? Perhaps the story would go in a direction that no one ever imagined it could go, slipping down a rabbit hole that could reinvigorate the entire franchise with something fresh and different.

(Source: IMDb)

Julia Ducournau

Many of the women on this list are those who work in horror and have no qualms with getting their hands dirty to make a good film. Julia Ducournau has perhaps the dirtiest, bloodiest history of any of these directors, diving straight into body-horror with her first film. But, that type of blood, sweat, and tears in her work betrays a true, deep humanity that could lend incredibly well to the characters in Jurassic World, making them more than simply characters in an action film.

Her breakout film, Raw, examines the human condition through a very inhuman lens, taking the audience to new extremes to discuss something very close to them. Ducournau’s narrative of a teenage cannibal at veterinary school deconstructs the way people – specifically women – are looked at and how society treats them, turning a genre film from simply something that makes viewers faint to a dark commentary on social politics.

Cannibalism and dinosaurs aren’t exactly the same thing, but Ducournau’s method of storytelling is one that could apply well to the Jurassic franchise. The politics of genetic cloning and animals rights are being hotly debated in today’s society, and offering someone like Ducournau the opportunity to take the reins of a big budget sci-fi franchise could take audiences down a yellow brick road of genre horror – replacing the glitter on the audience’s ruby slippers with a bit of blood, of course.

What do you think? Who are your picks to direct the third Jurassic World installment? Let us know in the comments below!

‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ Viral Website Answers Questions While Creating All New Mysteries

Get ready for a deep dive into Ingen’s secrets and inconsistencies.

Alongside the ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ Super Bowl trailer earlier this month, the viral website for Dinosaur Protection Group formally launched with a trove of new information and images. The DPG is a fictional organization introduced in the upcoming Jurassic Park sequel founded by Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard), with the goal of gaining public and financial support to save the dinosaurs of Isla Nublar from the ‘extinction level’ eruption of the once dormant Mount Sibo.

Claire’s ambition to save the dinosaurs is driven by not only an empathetic bond to animals in need, but the moral responsibility of those who created the dinosaurs to save them from a doomed fate – a fate humanity dictated due to their unnatural forced containment and isolation. The DPG argues mankind must be held accountable for the life they’ve created, for better or worse, and it’s their obligation to save the dinosaurs via relocation or other means.

Thus, the ‘in-universe’ intent of the Dinosaur Protection Group website is to educate the world not only about the prehistoric life created through de-extinction, but to also help the public better understand the history of InGen’s actions, and the range of impact the epochal company has induced.

In a new DPG update today, the groundwork is set for explaining many of the mysteries of the Jurassic universe (such as why was the Spinosaurus not on InGen’s list, for starters). But before we go that far, it’s best to understand the lay of the land – after the San Diego incident in 1997, the Gene Guard Act was passed by the US House Committee in collaboration with InGen. The act rewarded currently existing dinosaur species the same rights as naturally existing endangered species, protected the islands from outsiders, and outlawed furthered creation of extinct prehistoric fauna.

This act was put into place before John Hammond passed away, and at the time InGen was fully committed to upholding a greater standard of ethics, standing as guardians of these majestic animals from the past. The restrictions would remain enforced when Masrani Global acquired InGen in 1998, though it was later discovered the company neglected the law well before the sanctions were dropped in 2003 (note: those sanctions were later discovered to be removed under illegal pretenses such as bribery).

The breaches in the Gene Protection Act began as soon as 100 days after Masrani Globals acquisition of InGen, and led to the creation of the Spinosaurus, Ankylosaurus, Ceratosaurus, and Corythosaurus* (all new species which first appeared in Jurassic Park 3). Curiously, the Jurassic Park 3 Ankylosaurus varies from that seen in Jurassic World – perhaps it’s an example of sexual dimorphism, where the males of the species have a different body structure and a splash of red on their face. The aformentioned file leak dates to 1997, prior to the acquisition; presumably any new variation of dinosaur seen in ‘World’ not listed as illegally cloned was created after 2003.

*Note: Despite what the DPG says, the Corythosaurus was not cloned illegally, and existed on Isla Sorna prior to the Gene Protection Act. It can be seen as part of the species list in ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’.

The files also point to the breeding Velociraptors, and much like Grant did, assumes Frog DNA is to blame. However, this does not take into account that modern reptiles and birds have been observed changing sex, and breeding in nature. As birds are a direct decedent of dinosaurs, and share the common archosaur ancestory with reptiles, it can be assumed that particular genetic ability evolved naturally. Hence, even without the frog DNA, dinosaurs would likely find a way to breed in certain circumstances. This is further evidenced by the documented breeding of Stegosaurs, Triceratops, Tyrannosaurs, Gallimimus, Pteranodons, and in all likelihood, numerous other species (for example sexual dimorphism can be observed in Parasaurolophus with green females, and orangeish males).

What the InGen file leak does not account for is the curious omission of Proceratosaurus, both a species on the Jurassic Park map, and a viable embryo stolen by Dennis Nedry – perhaps this can be explained by carelessness in InGens archival of information, or it was scrubbed from record for even more nefarious motives. Further anomalies that are yet to be explained are the separate sub-species of Velociraptor, Brachiosaurus, and Pteranodon observed on Isla Sorna during the events of Jurassic Park 3.

The latest DPG blog entry is vague on the status of Isla Sorna – it’s alluded that InGen at least claimed they moved all species to Isla Nublar, however the likelihood of that being true or possible seems slim at best – especially as many of the species of Sorna are nowhere to be found on Nublar. While one may account that to population extinction, earlier DPG updates suggest the only known extinctions are Metriacanthosaurus and Edmontosaurus on Isla Nublar only.

There is a lot more to dig into on the Dinosaur Protection Group website, such as dinosaur population counts from 1993 to 1997, illustrating the various survival rates and hunting patterns of the animals on both islands. Further, it showcases that some of the new dinosaurs seen in ‘World’ were species InGen aspired to create via incomplete genomes during the ‘Park’ era, such as the Dimorphodon and Allosaurus.

This is an exciting time to be a Jurassic Park fan, and further dig into the canon of the films. Be sure to check the website out, and sound off on what you think of this latest lore expansion!

Source: Dinosaur Protection Group

The Next ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ Trailer Should Allude to More yet Show Less


Before we dive in, I want to give some perspective and context to my mindset while writing this article. I worry that perhaps the intent may be lost due to a lack of eloquence of writing on my part while crafting this, so this forward of sorts felt necessary. While this article will surely be interlaced with personal opinion and critique, it’s not a sanctimonious attempt to make a statement of authoritative opinion. Rather, it’s meant as an explanation for my and so many others reactions to the Fallen Kingdom trailer, and most of all, to pose my worries that the followup will try to answer these concerns by showing far too much of the film, rather than addressing these concerns in a more graceful fashion.

I do not think a poor trailer equates a poor film, and am not judging the film off of the trailer itself. But promising words from filmmakers can only go so far, especially when you’re shown the exact opposite in execution. That is why this trailer failed to resonate with me – but make no mistake, I’m still looking forward to the upcoming sequel, and cannot wait to see JA Bayona’s vision put on screen.

Now, let’s get to the point. Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve no doubt seen the Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom Trailer which released online early this month, making waves across the internet. For posterity’s sake, we’ve got you covered:

After viewing this trailer, I’ve come to the conclusion whomever cut it loves Jurassic Park for very different reasons than most others – this trailer was all the most controversial parts of Jurassic World, multiplied with far too common elements of modern Hollywood blockbusters; the hybrid nobody asked for. Now one can argue that it’s a matter of taste and personal opinion, but there is no getting around that it so strongly conflicts with the messaging the filmmakers pushed prior to its release.

So why didn’t that trailer work for me?

What Was Promised:

Well, for starters the entire awareness lead-up to the trailer was virtually nonexistent, seemingly cornering Universal into a position where they felt forced to show too much from the film (I’m looking at you, stampede setup and payoff, plus the Carnotaurus and T. rex showdown). In what appeared to be a further reaction to the lack of longterm lead-up, they also released almost everything from the trailer in a week-long awareness campaign. While it was certainly fun during, it took the wind out of the trailer, showing most of its bigger moments prior to release. However, the real issue as stated prior, was it completely went against everything the filmmakers promised with this film.

Colin Trevorrow and director JA Bayona have promised numerous times that Fallen Kingdom would be a return to Jurassic Park form, delivering on more intimate thrills and character drama. Rewinding back, Colin Trevorrow shared this about the Jurassic World sequel a little over a year ago in our interview with him (paraphrasing):

‘This movie doesn’t need to be ‘bigger’. It’s not about ‘bigger better dinosaurs’ or ‘bigger action sequences’. Colin brought up Raptors in the Kitchen scene vs Indominus Rex Helicopter explosion, and how the simplicity of the former is just as effective – if not more.’

Colin went on to say:

It will be more suspenseful and scary. It’s just the way it’s designed; it’s the way the story plays out. I knew I wanted Bayona to direct it long before anyone ever heard that was a possibility, so the whole thing was just built around his skill set.”

Speaking to El Mundo, Colin had this to say:

“The dinosaurs will be a parable of the treatment animals receive today: the abuse, medical experimentation, pets, having wild animals in zoos like prisons, the use the military has made of them, animals as weapons. [Fallen Kingdom] will be a very different, more complex movie that will explore new paths. For that reason, it was clear that it needed to be Bayona who would direct it, in order to have it grow and evolve with his very personal vision.”

“You need to be faithful to the legacy, while bringing new exciting [things]” – JA Bayona:

‘Will Fallen Kingdom be more Jurassic World 2, or Jurassic Park 5’?

JA Bayona:

“That’s a good question! I think somehow it’s both. It’s a very good question, and what we’re doing is a sequel to Jurassic World, but it’s definitely the fifth chapter of a longer saga. It’s very interesting. It’s always tricky, but you need to find a balance in what people expect to find, and the new stuff you’re bringing to the story. And I think the story is looking for a connection between Jurassic World and Jurassic Park — more than what Jurassic World did.”

Finally, Colin Trevorrow set the groundwork of our expectations in 2015, while speaking to JurassicCast Podcast:

“It will get to be a different kind of film. The audience has given us permission to a certain extent to take this to the next level, and I don’t necessarily mean in scale, I feel very strongly that it’s not about more dinosaurs or bigger and better dinosaurs, it’s about using this as a starting point for a much larger story about our relationship with these animals and about animals in general and the dynamic created by bringing them back to life.”

“We’ve seen a lot of ‘dinosaurs chasing people around on an island’ movies. I think you guys and also the general audience is going to be down to explore where else we can go.”

“[Owen and Claire] opened Pandora’s Box in Jurassic World, and each of them are responsible for different elements of it in different ways, and I think the way that these characters are connected to the circumstances of what’s happening it’s different than the previous films. It’s not ‘Let’s manufacture a way to get them somewhere.”

There are plenty of other quotes out there pushing similar messaging, but that should suffice as a crash course for everything Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom prior to the trailer drop. Full stop – it’s intermission time. As a palate cleanser, check out the behind the scenes piece, which does a far better job selling the movie and its themes:

Where Things Stand:

Movie trailers are more than a marketing tool, they’re an art form, and they’re very easy to get wrong. Movie trailers in themselves should serve as a thematic short story, leaving you both satisfied, yet wanting more. The first, and arguably most important element is how to open it, and grab the audience; the hook. For reasons I’m unsure of, the hook for this trailer is not the status of the dinosaurs, Jurassic World, or the impact the events of 2015’s film had on the world… but rather Owen and Claire, particularly their hamfisted and less than nuanced romantic issues.

“Do you remember the first time you saw a dinosaur?”

The behind the scenes trailer companion piece opens on an entirely different hook (above), and arguably one infinitely more successful. Mystery, intrigue, wonder, and nostalgia interlaced with a tone both fresh, yet familiar to fans of the franchise dictates the flow of that piece. It opens on new a locale, recognizable music, and catches the attention of the audience with a pertinent question invoking familiarity, while promising the unknown off the cusp.

Movie trailers, once they catch your attention, should begin to ramp up in the scale of events – and there is no denying the trailer does that, as things become rather explosive and bombastic. However, they should also expand in themes and story elements, and despite the disembodied voice asking if dinosaurs deserve the same rights as animals, we’re treated to a visual spectical meant to look cool, rather than tragic or terrifying. For a movie about animal rights, it sure shows a lot of them die terrible deaths, and nothing about the execution implies the heavier themes promised on the surface level.

The way the trailer frames the movie implies a simple point a to point b plot: recruit for a rescue mission, debate the ethics of saving the dinosaurs, arrive on the island and begin capturing dinosaurs, and the volcano erupts during the climax putting our heroes in peril. So many people took to social media to complain not only about the simplicity of the plot, but the fact that they felt whole thing was spoiled that Colin Trevorrow shared this tweet to ease minds:

I land in the ‘less is more’ camp for trailers, but this trailer didn’t show less, it just showed a whole lot more about one particular element of the film, and did a poor job selling the vision and story the filmmakers wish to take us on. Strangely, the easy to miss synopsis of the film handled the themes at play in a much better way, promising more to the story with the final sentence:

It’s been four years since theme park and luxury resort Jurassic World was destroyed by dinosaurs out of containment. Isla Nublar now sits abandoned by humans while the surviving dinosaurs fend for themselves in the jungles.

When the island’s dormant volcano begins roaring to life, Owen (Chris Pratt) and Claire (Bryce Dallas Howard) mount a campaign to rescue the remaining dinosaurs from this extinction-level event. Owen is driven to find Blue, his lead raptor who’s still missing in the wild, and Claire has grown a respect for these creatures she now makes her mission. Arriving on the unstable island as lava begins raining down, their expedition uncovers a conspiracy that could return our entire planet to a perilous order not seen since prehistoric times.

Conspiracy that pits the themes of conservation and empathy against greed and exploitation? Now you’re speaking my Michael Crichton infused language. The best part is, the synopsis doesn’t spoil who or how that conspiracy plays out, we simply know that not everybody plans to save the dinosaurs for the right reasons. Is every character who they say they are – and just what is that conspiracy – and what happens if those less than savory sorts succeed? That is what the trailer should be hinting at.

The next trailer has its work cut out for it: it needs to show the grander themes at play, without spoiling the finer details of it. It needs to deliver on the promises of a more intimate and suspenseful film akin to Jurassic Park. It needs to excite, and show something new, without giving away the plot elements. Most of all, it needs to wash that generic big budget CG flick vibe away, and not show anymore spoilers like the Carnotaurus scene. (Seriously, way to make the most anticipated dinosaur by fans since 1996 feel pointless now that we know how its big scene plays out.)

“What we tried to do was find the animal in the dinosaur, as opposed to the monster in the dinosaur. The idea was not to make them any less threatening, but rather to keep them from doing as much monster ‘schtick’. For our human characters, we wanted their situation to be more like they were being stalked by an animal that is a carnivore, as opposed to something that is psychopathic and just out to get them.” – Production Designer Rick Carter in ‘The Making of Jurassic Park’

Ultimately, for me dinosaurs are animals, not monsters. That was the defining element of Jurassic Park, and was no accident, as every behind the scenes interview or feature from that film will assert. The movie executed the concept beautifully, from the design to the behavior. One of my holdups, and this is something that some others share, is that Jurassic World depicted most of the dinosaurs as heroes, villains, or set pieces. Pets, or monsters. I had hoped Fallen Kingdom would perhaps handle those concepts in a more subtle way, and while it is certainly too soon to judge, scenes like ‘Deus Rex Machina’ didn’t quite bring me where I hoped to be.

We know the next trailer is coming during the Super Bowl, and we know those trailers are usually quite bombastic, so this message is to the marketing team: please do not spoil the movie. We’ve already seen too much, yet not what I wanted. I know I’m personally excited for the film, and can’t wait to see more – but that first trailer was like jumping into ice cold water, it was not what I expected or hoped for, and I needed time to adjust.

While many members of the Jurassic Outpost team share these opinions, it’s worth noting we’re a diverse site with differing opinions – and I am not asserting every opinion of mine reflects that of the entire site. Nor am I asserting it reflects that of the readers – so sound off, join the discussion, and let us know what you think!

The Jurassic Park Trilogy is Getting New Blu Ray Covers So Bad We Thought They Were Fake

The Jurassic Park name means something – whether it’s the seal of quality only Spielberg can bring, pushing the boundaries of visual effects, or the iconic dinosaur designs. It’s a mega franchise running over 25 years if you count the novels, and its name is synonymous with quality. So why does the franchise seem to lack any real quality control (or at least the budget for good Photoshop artists)?

Welcome, to B-movie quality cover art park. To truly appreciate the travesties on display above, you should first look at them at full size and resolution, because the compressed picture just doesn’t do it justice. Snarky jokes aside, those covers just are not good – and for more reasons than poor photoshop skills.

First up, Jurassic Park – conceptually it is a great cover (they all are – in concept), and Alan Grant and the Ford Explorer do look fantastic. Unfortunately, they look more like a previs concept. The Tyrannosaurus stands out of place, featuring a strangely modified male Tyrannosaurus head from The Lost World, not the female from Jurassic Park (plus it’s just poorly composited). In fact, the head used here is the bizarrely malformed head used on the 2015 Jurassic World products.

Wait. Is that a thumb on the Tyrannosaurus!? A moment ago we were going to point out Alan Grant wasn’t looking at the Rex, but now that issue seems Compsognathus sized. That’s not the only issue at play – the Tyrannosaurs right leg and foot are larger than the left, meaning they should be in front – however, the rear left leg has been photoshopped to land in the front.

The Lost World cover is plagued with just as many issues (ignoring the ugly logo, which would be an issue on its own). First off, the photoshop composition is just bad – which is frustrating, as the base image used (above) is a great choice. Of course the Stegosaurs pictured are far too large (even by The Lost World’s standards), but the idea behind the cover is fun. However, as Jurassic Park teaches us, intention doesn’t overrule execution.

The other issue is the two Stegosaurus’ on display aren’t from The Lost World: Jurassic Park – they’re the drastically different design from Jurassic World. In fact, the two renders on the cover are from Fallen Kingdom, and have already been spotted on early merchandise images. At least this can answer the raging question – do Jurassic World Stegosaurs have beaks like TLW and the real animal? Apparently not.

The Jurassic Park 3 cover is easily the least offensive. The composition of the overall image looks good, the Pteranodon is mostly accurate to the film, and it captures the feel of the movie. It’s just stuck with an ugly logo, and a really poorly photoshopped Billy Brennan face on the cover (perhaps he’s reacting to the other two covers).

Minus the logo, this one at least looks like a professional film studio released it, even if it’s a bit sloppy. Though we have to wonder – why is it Billy on the cover (or wait – is that actually Nicholas Cage)? Further, why not the Spinosaurus? Those aren’t really issues, but the choices stood out as discussion points none the less.

It’s not just us scoffing at the new covers and initially questioning their legitimacy. In fact, the whole community seems to be having the same overall reaction:

For more community reactions see our Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter comments plus this Reddit thread.

So, how exactly did this new cover lineup pass quality control? While we can’t answer that, we can say it’s not the first time something like this slipped by for Jurassic Park. In fact, it’s not even the worst. The worst would be the 2013 Jurassic Park 3D IMAX Poster.


Art is subjective, but when it comes to meeting the quality and established designs from the base material, the line is crossed to objectivity. To be blunt, the poster and covers above are just not good. In fact, they’re awful, and a poor representation of the source material. This isn’t a case of a fandom entitlement complex (which is a real issue), but simply a poor look for the films overall. When talented artists put out better unofficial work on a daily basis, there is a big issue.

While the above artwork looks like it came from the studio that brought you Sharknado, the next point is something more subjective. The Jurassic Park 25th Anniversary key art looks more like a child’s coloring book cover than the celebration of the longstanding legacy of the film franchise.

The cartoony art style for the fossil backdrop is nothing at all like the visuals on display in Jurassic Park, nor does it mirror or celebrate the artwork used in 1993. 1993 used simple black backdrops, or the iconic jungle sunset motif. If they must insist on a fossil backdrop, at least go minimalistic and inspired by the pillars in visitors center (and actually illustrate dinosaurs depicted in Jurassic Park).

Though, as we said prior, this one is subjective – at least the artwork for Jurassic Park 25th looks professionally done, even if it does seem out of place. At the very least, it’s not another case of Velociraptor toys being released without sickle claws.

Nor are they the frog faced, green Jurassic Park 2011 Blu Ray statue (the original female Tyrannosaurus is brown, and certainly doesn’t look like this):

In the 2010’s the Jurassic brand hit an awkward stride, with products and images that don’t reflect the brand they belong to. With 2015’s Jurassic World, most chocked it up to rapid growing pains – but over two years later, the excuse seems a little less genuine. Perhaps a lack of a visual style guide and story bible has led an inability to properly vet creative outputs (but that doesn’t explain poor composition – that simply looks cheap and rushed).

This isn’t meant to be an attack piece – Universal Pictures releases some of our favorite films, and their offices are filled with talented, kind, smart, and enthusiastic people. This isn’t personal – just an observation of the some of the high profile Jurassic misfires. We digress. Rant over.

The Blu Rays are listed on Amazon.com, and judging by the back covers are simple releases of the other standalone Blu Rays, with no new content. Considering the cover art, these are easy skips, unless you’re an absolute completionist collector. If you’re on the market for Jurassic Blu Rays, be on the look out for these – they have great covers, and the same content:

This begs the question – if there is no new content on the Blu Rays, will Jurassic Park 25th Anniversary get its own release with new content in the coming months? The demand is there for a 4K release, and the 25th anniversary would the perfect time!

Sound off in the comments below, and let us know what you think of the covers! If you’re a photoshop wizard, perhaps you can take a stab at making your own custom covers and share them with us. As always, stay tuned for the last news – with the Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom trailer coming within a month, things are sure to get exciting soon.

Source: Amazon.com (Via @gencinexin and Blu-Ray.com)