It Begins: Jurassic World 3 has begun filming on Vancouver Island, Canada!

Hold on to your butts, Jurassic World 3 has officially entered the primary start of its production with filming commencing.

Reports have recently shared that sixth Jurassic Park sequel was set to film around Vancouver in British Columbia, we knew to keep our eyes peeled. Thanks to CTV News, we learned earlier today that filming was due to start this week in Cathedral Grove on Vancouver Island — and now fans on the ground have confirmed cameras are rolling!

The signs in the picture above that state GFP stand for Gramercy Films Productions, the production company Jurassic World 3 (under the working title of “Arcadia”) is filming under. The filming will close certain trailers for portions of time, and feature drone cameras capturing footage. Fans are reporting that the drone itself can be spotted, but not much else:

While we don’t know much about what’s going on, In an appearance on talk-show Ellen, Chris Pratt dubbed Jurassic World 3 as feeling like Avengers: Endgame, in that the movie will bring back numerous characters and according to the actor himself – “it’s got pretty much everybody in it” – and he went to confirm he was leaving for Canada today to begin filming:

Chris adds “All the cast from the original Jurassic Park are coming back… it’s going to feel like how Endgame brought everything together”

Are you excited for Jurassic World 3 to begin filming? It’s almost a weird feeling to think that we waited a very long time for the fourth entry into the franchise and here we are, discussing the sixth Jurassic Park movie.

Stay tuned as more exciting news is sure to drop soon!

‘Jurassic World 3’ Filming Under the Working Title of ‘Arcadia’; Adds Vancouver Canada to Filming Locations

If you’re like us, you’re itching for some new Jurassic World 3 news, and thankfully today we can scratch that itch with some fun information. First off, we’ve received public confirmation that Jurassic World 3 will be filming under the working title of “Arcadia” (or Arcadia Pictures Limited). For those unfamiliar, a working title is used as a placeholder prior to final titles being chosen, and sometimes to help ‘hide’ the real title, avoiding too much casual bystander attention when in public areas. “Arcadia”, the final of the current Jurassic World trilogy, joins Ebb Tide (Jurassic World) and Ancient Futures (Fallen Kingdom).

The other, and more substantial bit of news, is the reveal of a new filming location: Vancouver Canada. This location, while a popular spot for film and TV, marks the first time Jurassic has ventured its way. However, this is not the core filming locale, as it is currently expected to film from February 24th, 2020 to March 6th 2020 only. Vancouver Canada joins Pinewood Studios in London, and the island of Malta as current known filming and production locations.

However, that’s not all – Hawaii is expected to return as a filming location as well!

It’s unclear what capacity any of these locations will play in the film, as the story remains tightly under wraps. The core of the production will be completed in the soundstages of Pinewood Studios, which will no doubt double as numerous real-world and fictional locations for the film. As Fallen Kingdom released the dinosaurs onto the mainland, and the technology into numerous hands, we’re excited and curious to see how these filming locations will play out on screen.

Do you think ‘Jurassic World 3’ will focus on all new locations, or might we see the return of Isla Nublar or Sorna? Let us know in the comments below, and stay tuned for all the latest news!

Source: Production Weekly (via @Sickle_Claw), Hollywood North


Watch Sam Neill ‘Clam up’ When Asked If He Will Be in Jurassic World 3

Look, it’s probably the worst kept secret that Sam Neill, Laura Dern, and Jeff Goldblum will be returning to tango with dinosaurs in Jurassic World 3. All the same, we can’t really be sure until it’s official.

Until then, here’s some more fuel for that fire:

In the clip above you can see Sam Neill sitting down with IMDB at Toronto 2019, being asked if he might return for Jurassic World 3. Unsurprisingly, he gives a non-answer. But his look says it all – not to mention last time he was asked directly, he had a less optimistic answer, suggesting he believed Grant to be dead.

Judging from the above, Neill no longer believes Dr. Grant to be long dead and forgotten. We certainly hope that isn’t the case.

Jurassic World 3 begins filming early next year, and is being written by Colin Trevorrow and Emily Carmichael. Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard will return, and BD Wong and Isabella Sermon are also expected to reprise their roles. No word on who will be handling the practical dinosaur animatronics, though given Neal Scanlan’s departure we’re hopeful for Legacy Effects to finally be given the chance to shine with Jurassic Park just as Stan Winston Studios once did.

Are you excited for what seems to be the return of the classic Jurassic characters? Be sure to let us know in the comments!

Source: IMDB


Colin Trevorrow Hints Sequels After Jurassic World 3 Are Not out of the Question

Many of us assumed this would be the case but it appears the dinosaurs are not going extinct in Jurassic World 3. Speaking to Variety during the Jurassic World ride grand opening, Jurassic World and Jurassic World 3 writer/director Colin Trevorrow was asked about the future of the Jurassic franchise after the sixth film.

While he words his way around the question if Jurassic World 3 will be the end of the saga, he gives credence to the very real possibility of future films:

“I’m kind of a one movie at a time kind of guy, so my eyes are on this one. And it’s a celebration of everything that has existed in the franchise up until now.”

It was long believed that Universal Pictures only had the rights for six total films during the lead up to Jurassic Park 4, but after ‘World’s’ gigantic success it’s logical they approached the Crichton Estate for a new deal. Jurassic World continues to expand into new territory, with theme park representation, an animated series ‘Camp Cretaceous’, and even a live action spin-off titled ‘Battle at Big Rock’. The franchise is Universal’s equivalent to Star Wars and it makes sense they would wish to continue expanding the stories and films into the future.

We’ve heard buzz about films after Jurassic World 3 for some time now, with some rumours even suggesting the third film would become a two-parter due to its “epic scale”. Jurassic World 3 is slated to begin filming early next year, with a release date of June 2021, although you won’t have to wait that long to see the story continue. ‘Battle at Big Rock’, the live action short film which filmed in Ireland this January, was to debut in front of Hobbs and Shaw. Sadly we’ve since heard that ‘Big Rock’ will not make it front of the latest ‘Fast and the Furious’ film and has been delayed to an unknown date.

Though unsubstantiated, we’ve even heard ‘Big Rock’ is being eyed as a proof-of-concept pitch and unofficial pilot for Jurassic making an eventual TV series debut. Whatever happens we hope the spin-off is officially announced soon.

It’s all too clear Jurassic World 3 isn’t the end and we’re happy to hear it. With that in mind, be sure to let us know what you want after Jurassic World 3 in the Twitter poll above and in the comment section!

Source: Variety

Bryce Dallas Howard More or Less Confirms Return of Alan Grant, Ellie Sattler, and Ian Malcolm in Jurassic World 3!

Hold on to your butts – it seems the original Jurassic Park trio are returning in Jurassic World 3!

Either this is the worst kept secret ever, or they knew they couldn’t keep this contained, and decided to have fun with it up until the official announcement. Either way, this isn’t the first time we’ve heard talk of Laura Dern and Jeff Goldblum returning, but now Sam Neill has joined the party. Speaking to MTV while promoting Rocketman, Bryce Dallas Howard couldn’t contain her excitement when asked if she would be acting alongside those iconic Jurassic Park characters.

Check out the clip below!

We understand Bryce, we wouldn’t be able to keep up a poker face if we had to keep that secret either! Now that the cat has been let out of the bag many, many times, we think it’s time Universal just makes it official – it would be a great Jurassic June gift to the community, even if it is early in the news cycle.

Bryce Dallas Howard plays the character of Claire Dearing, Jurassic World’s ex-operations manager, who was last seen on the Californian coastline with Owen Grady, Maisie Lockwood, and some pesky Pteranodons. How Dr.’s Alan Grant, Ellie Sattler, and Ian Malcolm may cross Claire’s path is an exciting prospect overflowing with unknown opportunity. With the dinosaurs on the loose in California, as well as the species sold and transported to shady underworld locations worldwide, we’re sure each of these characters could have their hands full in various different ways.

Are you excited to see the return of the original Jurassic Park characters return in 2021 with Jurassic World 3, and how do you want them to be integrated into the story? Sound off in the comments below and let us know your thoughts!


Watch ‘Indomation’ – A Stop-Motion Jurassic Park Tribute!

Before Dennis Muren wowed Steven Spielberg with computer generated dinosaurs at ILM, the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park were going to animated by hand by Phil Tippett and his team, using a technique known as stop motion.

The release of Jurassic Park led to an industry shift, with this well crafted art form rapidly replaced by computer generated images. This technology opened up a world of possibilities and filmmakers of the era began to experiment.

However, the animation technique did not die out. Stop motion lives on through the likes of Phil Tippett and his Mad God series, and many modern day movies like Isle of Dogs, Coraline and the works of Aardman Animations.

A number of independent filmmakers have dived into the stop motion world, including Mason Drumm who created the following short film entitled Indomation. Check it out below:

The entire piece contains 93 hours of animation and contains 7,830 frames! The set took two months to construct, utilizing 35 sticks of glue and many, many props. A detailed behind the scenes video gives us a better look at how Mason pieced all of this together. The rotating set is ingenious – so simple yet so effective.

Click the above picture to watch the 10 minute behind the scenes feature – I recommend you do! Stop motion is a slow process and one that takes immense concentration and attention to detail. To say he was the sole animator on Indomation, Mason’s animation is fluid, and it’s clear that he had a vision for this project from the very beginning – one that he executed with great finesse.

I’m looking forward to seeing more of his work. Be sure to check out Mason’s YouTube channel and let him know if you liked his short film by commenting below!

Jurassic World: Evolution Inspired Fan Meetup Happening in London this March!

Open up your calendar as it’s time for another Jurassic Park community meetup!

Frequent collaborator Tom Jurassic is hosting a Jurassic World Evolution Unofficial Community Meetup on Friday 8th March at the Natural History Museum in London.

The meetup will take place from 1pm – and Tom has already promised a host of fun activities, Jurassic-themed goodies and more for anyone who takes the time to join him in London. Tom has also revealed another detail of this meetup for fans of Jurassic Outpost:

“Firstly – I really appreciate all the support from everyone in spreading word about the meetup! Both Jurassic Outpost and The Jurassic Park Podcast have been amazing in getting word out there – allowing me to focus on some behind-the-scenes work which has enabled something incredibly cool to occur! I am beyond excited to reveal that Paul from the Natural History Museum’s Dinosaur Lab will be giving an hour’s talk to people who come down for the meetup – with the talk taking place from 1:30pm – 2:30pm. The Natural History Museum do talks here and there, but they are something which the general visitor will not be able to access.

I’m super excited to be able to bring a little more to the Jurassic World Evolution Unofficial Community Meetup – building a special day which I hope Jurassic fans who can make it will remember for years to come!”

This sounds like a fantastic opportunity for those attending – allowing people to get more hands-on with the museum than they would usually be able to!

Tom’s put a lot of work into this meetup and like any Jurassic community meetup there will no doubt be a favourable turnout! If you’re in or around the London area be sure to try and make it.

The Natural History Museum in London features one of the most beautiful and comprehensive collections of palaeontological discoveries in the country, which you’ll have the chance to come face to face with! The museum hosts popular dinosaurs like the T-Rex and the Triceratops, alongside the star of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; the Baryonyx.

As Tom states: “We’ll take part in some fun Jurassic-themed games, and they’ll be a host of awesome Evolution prizes and goodies to give out throughout the day.”

A schedule for the day is still being locked down – but there is plenty to do in South Kensington including the Science Museum, so after spending a good amount of time at the Natural History Museum there will still be plenty more fun in store. The best part about all of this? The museums are all free entry!

You can learn more about Tom’s community meetup here, and be sure to let us know in the comments section below if you’ll be making it down!

Exclusive: Colin Trevorrow Shares His Experiences with ‘Fallen Kingdom’ + Talks Hopes for ‘Jurassic World 3’!

“My instinct is to break the classical language of these films a bit and plunge us into a world that feels real and naturalistic. I want to go outside into environments we’ve never seen these animals in. I’m watching a lot of Planet Earth.”

The excitement for a new Jurassic Park movie is a feeling that cannot be shaken by fans, and with Fallen Kingdom still fresh in everyone’s minds, we spoke with Jurassic World 3 director Colin Trevorrow who teased his plans for the upcoming sequel!

Along with those teases we speak about the fandom and the interactivity that Twitter can provide, Colin discusses his writing partner Emily Carmichael and what brought them together as co-writers, we talk the dinosaurs of the franchise, and Colin hints at a wealth of expanded universe content to follow in the future.

Grab your soda from the vending machine and enjoy the read, this is a good one!


When you were first approached for Jurassic Park 4, did you ever think you would be here today in the position you have with Jurassic? What lessons have you learned along the way?

It’s been a ride. Something happens around 40—you’ve lived long enough to look back and identify things about yourself that you realize are embedded pretty deep. I’ve seen patterns in my own work that have helped me understand myself a bit more. All of my films tend to be about a character who gets better, someone who is approaching life in a way that doesn’t represent their best self and then changes dramatically. Darius in Safety Not Guaranteed, Claire in Jurassic World, Susan in The Book of Henry. They’re all characters who have fallen into a pattern that needs to change, and through extraordinary circumstances they find a path to the better versions of themselves. If I’ve learned one lesson, it’s that I share something with the characters and stories I’m attracted to. I want to be the best version of myself, both as a filmmaker and as a person.

How did you meet your new writing partner on the next movie, Emily Carmichael, and what do you believe she will bring to the Jurassic franchise?

I saw a short of Emily’s called “The Hunter and the Swan Discuss Their Meeting”. I just knew immediately that I loved her brain. It’s different. Like a child who went to Harvard but still plays with toys. I brought a script of hers to Steven and we offered her a job writing a script she’s going to direct. She started going to meetings and her career took off. She worked on Pacific Rim 2 with a few other writers, then wrote The Black Hole for Disney on her own. It wasn’t hard to make the case that she should join the family. Her enthusiasm has been pretty infectious. She’s also an excellent Dungeon Master, as my kids will attest.

How involved are you with designing and choosing the dinosaurs, old and new, for each film? What is that process like, and what informs your choices? By design and definition, are there certain key elements you feel set Jurassic dinosaurs apart from others?

I’ve been lucky enough to be able to choose the dinosaurs, but Derek Connolly and JA Bayona and now Emily Carmichael will have each made contributions when it’s all said and done. It’s just a bunch of kids sitting on the floor with their toys. It’s the best part of my job, but also the hardest. You have to keep some great ones in the tank. I love the Carnotaurus and the Baryonyx, but I didn’t want to just see them in the background in Jurassic World. They deserve an entrance. So we put them on the park map, but held the reveal for the second film. The next film is even more fun because the opportunities have really opened up.

You’ve said Jurassic World 3 will have the most accurate dinosaurs yet. What exactly does that mean for a Jurassic film, feathers or otherwise, and what – if any – lessons have you learned from designing dinosaurs on the past two films?

We’re not looking to alter the dinosaurs from the previous movies. Those are established characters to me—they were made with reptilian DNA bridging the gaps in the genome and they have their own identity. But now we’re headed into a world in which the ability to clone a dinosaur is no longer exclusive to Dr. Henry Wu. That leads to innovation, and new opportunities for us to introduce species that represent the full spectrum of our knowledge.


Artwork by Simon Stålenhag – not related to Jurassic World 3

Many assume Jurassic World 3 will feature dinosaurs terrorizing cities and suburbs, and fans are often referring to properties like Godzilla and Planet of the Apes. Are these connections a fair assumption, or do you plan to keep the dinosaurs in the wilder, more untamed landscapes?

I just have no idea what would motivate dinosaurs to terrorize a city. They can’t organize. Right now we’ve got lethal predators in wild areas surrounding cities all over the world. They don’t go pack hunting for humans in urban areas. The world I get excited about is the one where it’s possible that a dinosaur might run out in front of your car on a foggy backroad, or invade your campground looking for food. A world where dinosaur interaction is unlikely but possible—the same way we watch out for bears or sharks. We hunt animals, we traffic them, we herd them, we breed them, we invade their territory and pay the price, but we don’t go to war with them. If that was the case, we’d have lost that war a long time ago.

“Jurassic World 3” or “Jurassic Park 6”? Ultimately a subtitle will replace the numbers, but is there a chance the ‘Park’ branding will return?

Emily and I call it Jurassic Park 6 because it’s fun, and that’s what it is to us. This is the conclusion of a story that began 25 years ago, and I think fans will be fired up when they see how much we’re connecting it to the source material. I know Jurassic World didn’t feel like a sequel in a traditional sense—the title change probably contributed to that—but it was. And so is this.

Will the visual style of Jurassic World 3 be influenced at all by what JA Bayona and Oscar Faura brought to the table?

JA and Oscar shot a beautiful film. If I’m being honest, I’d say they shot such a beautiful film, I’m not even looking to try and match it. They achieved something so gorgeous to look at, my instinct is to break the classical language of these films a bit and plunge us into a world that feels real and naturalistic. I want to go outside into environments we’ve never seen these animals in. I’m watching a lot of Planet Earth.

Jurassic as a brand handles itself quite differently than other mega- franchises out there – from your direct interactions with the community, to the inclusion of fans to create content like Masrani Global and the Dinosaur Protection Group. How important is that to you, and how would you say it helps Jurassic excel?

Our collaboration with the fans was something I first asked for back in 2015, and Universal was really open to it. The team delivered such a great experience with Masrani Global, we gave them a new assignment on Fallen Kingdom, and they crushed that, so we’re really going to be able to expand on that relationship with the third film. It always seemed obvious to me—who knows more about this lore than the fans? Why not just give them the keys and let them drive?

Did any fan and/or critical feedback to Jurassic World help shape your approach to writing Fallen Kingdom?

It did. We definitely took a turn into the darker side of Jurassic Park with that script. The first film was such a bright, colorful pop adventure. With Fallen Kingdom, we were looking to explore the uglier side of humanity and our cruel treatment of living creatures. But I think Bayona kept us from going too far—he embraced the darker elements, but also brought his own sense of playfulness and humor to the proceedings. When we initially wrote the dinosaur auction, we were imagining a dirty, unsavory bunch of animal traffickers huddled in a basement, trading lives for money. He turned it into the sequence you see in the film, which was more like a Sotheby’s auction for the super-wealthy. I think it played much better for kids, and was the right choice when balanced against the poor treatment of the animals we were seeing, which could have become irreparably sad. That’s the benefit of working with another director—you can see different sides of the story through their eyes.

Fan service has become a huge point of debate with larger franchise films. Striking a happy balance seems to be no easy task.

The fans keep my compass pointed in the right direction. Deep fans watch movies differently than the casual viewer, the same way critics watch films differently than the general audience. None of them are wrong. So I do a lot of listening. And every year, more dinosaur fans are born. These movies need to work simultaneously for those kids, for adults who love the old films, and for a diverse global audience—including some who didn’t even have American movies available to them when the first film came out. It’s a delicate balance. I feel like I’ve made a mix of bold choices and safe ones—hopefully once my tenure is done, the fans will look back and feel like I was a careful custodian.

Can you talk about your experience with social media? You directly engage with fans on various subjects. But amongst all that can come a lot of toxic trolling. How do you filter that?

You really can’t filter it. But when you dig deep enough into any fan’s anger, you’re going to find a deep love for the franchise they’re defending. To understand that level of passion—and sometimes furor—requires the same respect and tolerance you give to those with different belief systems than your own. But belief is no excuse for aggression toward those who don’t share your beliefs. It makes me sad to see the current state of the discourse, because the ugly rhetoric we’re throwing at each other is polarizing fandom the same way our politics is dividing us. I hope we find our balance again. I think we can.

It seems you are overseeing the greater Jurassic expanded universe, both in content and canon – is that correct? Can you talk a little about what your involvement is like with that?

Yeah, I’ve been involved since 2015, in collaboration with Steven and Frank. We’ve been working closely with Universal to build out the world and make sure that kids (and adults) who want to dig deeper have someplace to go. We’re really proud of the Mattel and LEGO toys, the console and mobile games from Frontier and Ludia, the VR experience from Felix and Paul, who are just brilliant. We just finished a two-part animated LEGO special that will air on NBC this week. All our creative partners have done awesome work. There’s a lot of things I can’t really talk about, I promise there will be no shortage of new developments in the next few years. But we’re being careful not to oversaturate. Some people just want to go see a dinosaur movie every three years, and that’s fine. Others want dinosaurs all the way down. We’re here for them, too.

Why do you think Jurassic has succeeded in making dinosaur movies work – something that would normally just become another creature feature, into something that is able to thrill and captivate audiences like the Jurassic franchise has done? Do you believe bringing that magic to life gets more difficult with each movie?

I think there’s something humbling about dinosaurs. They’re evidence that we’ve only occupied the earth for a tiny sliver of time. The line that encapsulates the whole series for me is Irrfan Khan’s moment at the beginning of Jurassic World. “Dinosaurs remind us how very small we are, how new.” Humans have only existed for 200,000 years. Dinosaurs were here in one form or another for 170 MILLION years. We act like this planet belongs to us, but we just got here. That’s the story I’m here to tell, and every choice we make is connected to it.

Now that certainly is a lot to digest! While ‘dinosaurs in war’ is an idea that’s been floated around for years, was featured in John Sayles’ Jurassic Park 4 script, and was even hinted at by a main character in Jurassic World, it’s great than Colin continues to shut this idea down in exchange for a much more realistic portrayal of wild animals in the ‘human’ world.

“The world I get excited about is the one where it’s possible that a dinosaur might run out in front of your car on a foggy backroad, or invade your campground looking for food. A world where dinosaur interaction is unlikely but possible—the same way we watch out for bears or sharks.”

Me too Colin, me too. This world would allow for the suspense and thriller aspects of Jurassic Park to return, and is going to allow us to see these dinosaurs interacting with new environments. Environments that aren’t restrained by the jungles of Isla Nublar and Isla Sorna, and instead feel much closer to home.

“My instinct is to break the classical language of these films a bit and plunge us into a world that feels real and naturalistic. I want to go outside into environments we’ve never seen these animals in.”

J.A. Bayona’s Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom ended with a number of shots showing the dinosaurs reaching cities and locations in and around California, and with the technology used to create these dinosaurs now out in the open world and potentially in the hands of large corporations that don’t have the animals best interests in mind, Jurassic World 3 could show us a much darker side to this story.

We want to say a huge thank you to Colin Trevorrow for this interview and for speaking with us! We hope you enjoyed the read and in case you missed our previous interview with the director back in 2016 you can find that here or listen to the podcast. There’s a surprise guest at the end. And that surprise guest is J.A. Bayona. Sorry to ruin the surprise. But it has been over two years since that interview, so that’s on you.

And be sure to take a listen to our brand new episode where we discuss this interview and go into detail on some of Colin’s answers:

Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for more Jurassic content!

‘Jurassic World 3’ or ‘Jurassic Park 6’? Colin Trevorrow Shares Photo with Writing Partner Emily Carmichael

One of this Summer’s largest blockbusters Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom has now released on digital and DVD/Blu-Ray, and with the Box Office numbers currently making it the fourth highest grossing movie domestically this year, it’s no surprise that the third movie in the Jurassic World trilogy is already in the works.

Set for release on June 11 2021, Jurassic World 3 is being penned by Colin Trevorrow and newcomer Emily Carmichael, who is best known for her work on Pacific Rim: Uprising.

Today Colin shared a photo of Emily and himself in France, where they met to discuss the sequel’s story.


While the photo’s intention is not to reveal anything about the story, what’s interesting is that Colin referred to the movie as Jurassic Park 6.

The Jurassic World trilogy stands as a reboot of a once popular franchise and successfully brought it back into mainstream culture. Reboot by definition does not mean remake, and the films continue on the same timeline established in the original trilogy. Dr. Henry Wu and Dr. Ian Malcolm are two characters from the original trilogy that have returned in the new movies, and this small nod by Colin could mean that we will see an even deeper connection to the original Jurassic Park in Emily and Colin’s story.

Not to mention the numerous hints being given by various cast members, it seems likely that paleobotanist Dr. Ellie Sattler may return. But of course, that’s just speculation.

“You can’t put it back in the box!” The ending of Fallen Kingdom sees dinosaurs now spread across the world, owned by various parties and being used for a varying number of tasks. And as Mill’s put it, there is no going back – not just with the animals, but the technology to make new ones.

What’s in store for Jurassic Park 6? There is a world of possibilities for where Emily and Colin could take the story, but one thing’s for sure: this will be the closing film in the current trilogy.

For more from Emily Carmichael, be sure to give her short film Stryka a watch, which she wrote and directed.

Where do you hope they take Jurassic World 3? Are you happy that we may be leaving the islands for good? Let us know your hopes for the sequel in the comments section below!

Devin and Chelsea Break ‘Jurassic Park: The Ride’ Record Before it Closes for Good

In a heartwarming video, two Jurassic Park fans spend their day riding Jurassic Park: The Ride at Universal Studios Hollywood before it closes for good.

But that’s not all. After breaking the record and completing 61 journeys through Jurassic Park, battling spitting Dilophosaurs and facing an angry T. rex, Devin got on his knees and proposed.

In a sneaky Dennis Nedry fashion, Devin hid the ring within a Barbasol cannister alongside DNA from species across the original park. How cool is that?

The couple who reside in LA have annual passes to the Hollywood park and have made it a tradition to ride the Jurassic Park ride every year on Chelsea’s birthday. The previous record was 60 rides in a day, and the pair rode it a total of 62 times. Along with the proposal, I don’t think this is a day they’ll soon forget!

Did you catch a look at the engagement ring? It was custom made and features mosquito amber. Spared no expense. The Barbasol cannister was a prototype by Chronicle Collectibles who will be releasing it in the near future.

Today marks the final day for Jurassic Park: The Ride. Opened on June 21, 1996, the ride has been a fan favourite since then and remains as one of the only rides left at the park without projections or 3D screens.

While it is a sad day, a new Jurassic World themed ride will take it’s place at the park in 2019 – and hopefully will feature a small glimpse at the original park. The river boat ride is to remain open at the Universal Studios Orlando park, and there are rumours that park will see an expansion within the Jurassic Park area.

Join us in congratulating Chelsea and Devin – what a wonderful way to propose and celebrate your engagement!

Will you miss the ride? Let us know in the comments section below what you hope to see in Jurassic World: The Ride!