First Look at 2019 ‘Jurassic World: Dino Rivals’ Toy Line from Mattel!

Since Mattel made their debut with the Jurassic license earlier this year, they have spared no expense bringing quality items to stores, and most importantly, fans and collectors. While the Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom tie-in line is wrapping up this Fall, the toys are not going extinct – in fact, they’re just getting started.

Take a first look at just some of the upcoming 2019 ‘Dino Rivals’ toys from Mattel, all only from the upcoming “Spring” wave (some of which are hitting shelves as early as THIS year!):

Attack Pack Assortment

Get ready to continue the thrilling action and adventure with Jurassic World: Dino Rivals! these attack pack dinosaurs are inspired by the movie and are known to herd, hunt and attack in packs. Each attack pack dinosaur figure includes five points of articulation, realistic sculpting and authentic decoration. Choose from Velociraptor, Dracorex, Rhamphorhynchus, and many more!. Each sold separately, subject to availability. Colors and decorations may vary.

Savage Strike Assortment

Be a part of the Jurassic World adventure with the ultimate in dinosaur rivalry and battle action! These smaller-size dinosaur action figures capture the ultimate movie action with their Savage Strike™ attack moves iconic to their respective species. Play out movie action scenes with Savage Strike™ attack moves like biting, head ramming, wing flapping and more. Just press a designated area on the dinosaur action figure to make it move (each dinosaur activation varies). Figures also include articulated arms and legs, realistic sculpting and authentic decoration. Get ready to battle it out—Savage Strike™ style—with these fierce action figures! Each sold separately, subject to availability. Each dinosaur comes with a cool Dino Rivals™ collector card detailing the dinosaur’s key battle stats and attributes. For more dinosaur fun, download the Jurassic World Facts app (Android and iOS) to scan and watch each dinosaur come to life, learn attack facts, compare stats and more!

Battle Damage Assortment

Get ready for thrilling action and adventure with Jurassic World! These Battle Damage dinosaur action figures have a spring-loaded damage panel feature that snaps back on impact to reveal the battle wound! Kids will love battling it out again and again to see the results. Just reset the Battle Damage action figure to play out favorite action battles from the movie again and again! Choose from Battle Damage Plesiosaurus, Battle Damage Pteranodon and many more. Each sold separately, subject to availability. Colors and decorations may vary.

Tracker ATV Set

Get ready for thrilling action and adventure with Jurassic World: Dino Rivals!Hit the road to adventure with this Jurassic World-inspired ATV vehicle with cool features! Front of the ATV transforms into a capture claw that you can use as you drive around to capture dinosaurs. Set comes with ATV vehicle, Owen figure, knife and gauntlet accessories, Dracorex dinosaur and card with dinosaur facts for complete storytelling play!

Mega Dual Attack Assortment

Experience Jurassic World dinosaur battle play in a whole new way! Jurassic World Mega Dual Attack dinosaur action figures come in a larger size and have dual-button activation for fierce battle action! Push the two buttons on each dinosaur to activate different battle features, such as tail strikes, head strikes and massive chomps! You can also press both buttons at the same time for dual-striking action! These dinosaur action figures have movie-inspired sculpting, an articulated head and tail, authentic color and realistic texture. Recreate all the epic Jurassic World battle-action scenes with these Mega Dual Attack dinosaur action figures! Choose from Stegosaurus, Suchomimus, Amargasaurus action figures and more (each sold separately, subject to availability). Each dinosaur comes with a cool Dino Rivals™ collector card detailing its key battle stats and attributes.

Bite ‘N Fight Tyrannosaurus Rex

Experience Jurassic World dinosaur battle play in a whole new way! This larger-scale Bite ‘N Fight Tyrannosaurus Rex has articulation and dual-button activation for fierce battle action! Push the back button on the Tyrannosaurus Rex and the tail strikes; press the front button and its head lunges forward with biting action and turns approximately 90 degrees. The harder you press the front button, the stronger the bite force becomes! You can also press both buttons at the same time for dual tail and head-striking action! This fan-favorite character has movie-inspired sculpting, an articulated head and tail, authentic color and realistic texture. Recreate all the epic Jurassic World battle-action scenes with this Bite ‘N Fight Tyrannosaurus Rex—but watch out—this Tyrannosaurus Rex has a huge BITE and swinging tail STRIKE! Comes with a cool Dino Rivals™ collector card detailing the dinosaur’s key battle stats and attributes.

Colossal Rex (re-release)

Get ready for thrilling action and adventure with Jurassic World! Based on the iconic Tyrannosaurus Rex from Jurassic World, Super Colossal Tyrannosaurus Rex is approximately three feet long with realistic detail and decoration. Large figure features articulated arms and legs, and extra-wide jaws that can open and close. Super Colossal Tyrannosaurus Rex can swallow up to 20 mini action figure dinosaurs whole (sold separately)! To release the dinosaurs, open the door on the belly.

This is just a small sampling of the items that will soon be available in stores – the entire 2019 Dino Rivals line boasts 16 entirely new species joining many new versions of previous dinosaurs. Exclusive assortments likes Battle Damage (Walmart) and Legacy Collection (Target) are continuing to expand, and should provide many fun surprises in the future.

Some of the upcoming toys not pictured here, but revealed at San Diego Comic Con 2018 are the Colossal Brachiosaurus, Mega Dual Attack Amargasaurus, and Franklin Webb human action figure. Be sure to keep your eyes open, as more pictures of the Dino Rivals toys are likely around the corner!

While the other items have yet to become available, the Attack Pack’s are already available to order on Amazon (with many more pictures): Dracorex, Rhamphorhynchus, Coelurus, Protoceratops, Velociraptor, and Herrerasaurus.

What are your thoughts on the revealed items, and what else do you hope the new line of toys bring? Sound off in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned for the latest news!


Bryce Dallas Howard Wants To See Original Characters Return in Jurassic World 3

Where has time gone? The Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom DVD/Blu-Ray is officially out in stores! On September 6th, Bryce Dallas Howard spent a day in NYC filming interviews and promoting the release. Now those interviews are popping up and, along with this, comes some speculation and light (very light) news on Jurassic World 3.

Bryce has mentioned in multiple interviews recently that she is especially eager to see the original cast return. Her answers have bounced between Laura Dern (specifically) and just all the original characters in general.

 

 

She also spoke with Collider about Jurassic World 3.

What have you heard about the final film in this trilogy?

HOWARD:  I’ve talked to a lot of different folks who are involved. Colin [Trevorrow] is writing it now with Emily [Carmichael], and she just brings such an incredible perspective and voice. They have been quite close for awhile, and Colin’s been a huge supporter of her work, and vice versa. The fact that they’re working on it now is exciting and inspiring. I saw them last week, and it’s good. It’s really, really good.

Especially with the way that Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom ended, do you have any personal hopes, for what could happen, now that it feels even more wide open?

HOWARD:  I think we’re gonna be seeing these characters be faced with impossible choices to make, and circumstances beyond their wildest dreams and nightmares, where these animals are now a part of the world again. It’s not just about a handful of dinosaurs that were able to be re-animated, and one hybrid dinosaur that is monstrous. Now, not only are the animals out there, but the technology is out there, as well. Who knows what people can create? I’m just really excited to see this imagined world changing.

(Source)


For your convenience, below is a FULL list of all the bonus features found on every disc available.

Bonus features

Here is the breakdown of bonus features exclusive to the Target DVD bonus disc:

  • Hollywood Royalty
  • Fallen Kingdom: the Villains
  • To Live And Die In Jurassic World
  • Zia & Wheatley
  • The Fallen Kingdom Rises: Production Design
  • Secret Revealed: Maisie
  • Giacchino/Bayona

Here is the breakdown of bonus features exclusive to 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray, and Digital:

  • The KINGDOM Evolves – Filmmakers discuss how the second chapter in the Jurassic World trilogy pushes the franchise in a new direction.
  • Return to Hawaii – Cast and crew discuss shooting the film in Hawaii.
  • Island Action – A behind-the-scenes look at the bunker scene and runaway gyrosphere sequence.
  • Aboard the Arcadia – Cast and crew discuss working with the animatronic dinosaurs.
  • Start the Bidding! – A behind-the-scenes look at the auction scene.

And here are the bonus features you’ll find on DVD, 4K Ultra, Blu-ray and Digital:

  • On Set with Chris & Bryce – Go behind the scenes with Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard.
  • Birth of the Indoraptor – An inside look at the genetically designed monstrosity known as the Indoraptor.
  • Death by Dino – Go behind the scenes as the Indoraptor faces off with a key character.
  • Monster in a Mansion – Director J.A. Bayona discusses how Jurassic Park and Dracula (1979) influenced his approach to directing the monster in a mansion scene.
  • Rooftop Showdown – A look at the terrifying showdown on the rooftop of the Lockwood Mansion.
  • Malcolm’s Return – Behind the scenes with the one & only Jeff Goldblum.
  • VFX Evolved – The team at ILM discuss their cutting-edge approach to creating dinosaurs.
  • FALLEN KINGDOM: The Conversation – Filmmakers and cast sit down for a candid and casual conversation about Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.
  • A Song for the KINGDOM – Justice Smith sings for the cast and crew of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.
  • Chris Pratt’s Jurassic Journals
    • Vivian Baker, Makeup Artist
    • Mary Mastro, Hair Stylist
    • Chris Murphy, 1st Assistant Sound
    • Dean Bailey, Stunt Edge Car Driver
    • Peter Harcourt, Diver
    • Daniella Pineda and Justice Smith, Actors
    • Jody Wiltshire, Set PA
    • Kelly Krieg, Assistant Script Supervisor
    • J.A. Bayona, Director
    • James Cox, Stunt Performer
    • Rachelle Beinart, Stunt Double
    • Bryce Dallas Howard interviews Chris Pratt, Actor
  • · JURASSIC Then and Now – Presented by Barbasol® – Key moments from the Jurassic saga that tie into Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.

(Source)

Jurassic World Toys Are Outperforming Star Wars – but How Can They Keep the Momentum? We Have Some Ideas!

Star Wars has long been the gold standard for licensed media in the toy aisle, with a multitude of products, quality items, and strong sales. While the craftsmanship on the toys from Hasbro has seen a recent downward trend, causing their 2015 Jurassic World line to be met with much ire, Star Wars continues to perform successfully. It’s an evergreen property, with numerous movies, comics, books and cartoons to support interest and awareness with fans of all ages, driving toy sales forward.

In 2016, it was announced Mattel had won the bid for the Jurassic World / Park toy master license, taking it from Hasbro who had held since 1993 (if you count that they owned Kenner). Mattel spared no expense, and hit the ground running with their Jurassic toy line which made its debut in Spring of 2018 to coincide with the latest sequel, Fallen Kingdom. With Mattel in charge of the license, they reaffirmed Jurassic as a quality industry leading brand, ripe with innovative and diverse play patterns, quality film accurate toys, topped off with incredible competitive pricing models not seen in current competition. These choices, along with the Jurassic presence in theaters now has led to kids, parents, and collectors all being enticed to purchase and play.

With the latest waves of Mattel Jurassic World toys hitting shelves now, the dinosaurs are on a rampage of fun – according to the NPD Group, Jurassic is currently outselling Star Wars action figures in the US. Jurassic and Marvel led action figures sales to grow by 16%, which is no small feat given the closing of Toys R Us. While internationally, Star Wars is the number 3 overall brand (this encompasses more than action figures), and Jurassic has not broken top 10, this performance shows great opportunity for momentum moving forward – especially as dinosaur toys have grown in popularity by 77% year to date.

Personally, I see incredible potential for Jurassic World moving forward – but it will take some work. As such, I’ve lightly outlined some of my proposed transmedia expansion concepts below.

Room for Growth

Universal Pictures in conjunction with Mattel and other brand partners are in the unique position to build upon this momentum to further strengthen brand awareness, diversity, and demand. Jurassic, regardless of a film in theaters, can and should become synonymous with dinosaur toys and products for fans of all ages. Dinosaurs have an everlasting appeal, and populate toy and product shelves even without expanded marketing. With Jurassic’s unique hold on pop culture, it can take hold of the forefront of dinosaur media and hardline sales, expanding it into new territory, just as Star Wars has become a prime staple of merchandise aisles.

To fully leverage this opportunity, the brand itself need to expand its transmedia thumbprint and target as many different age groups and demographics as possible. While the films target a slightly older audience (around 7 and up) with a PG-13 rating, there is plenty of room for growth in the pre-school sector. To drive that brand awareness and acceptance amongst parents, something like a educational and friendly ‘Jurassic World Rangers’ animated series could do wonders – let it take place when the park was open, and follow the paths of vets and trainers working with the animals as they become sick or distressed. Let it be about aiding the animals, and let it teach young audiences all about the dinosaurs and characters jobs in exciting and positive scenarios. With the kids and parents on board, they’ll surely be fans for life as they grow into the core media and product offerings.

To better sustain the core Jurassic brand, the possibilities and perhaps need for expanded media sustain programs are endless. This could range from toys backed by animated content targeting the appropriate age range and tone, animated series, books, comics, video games, and live action “spin-off” stories (be it film, TV, or shorts). Most importantly, this content must be high quality, representing the brands film legacy and reputation, delivering top of the line content no matter the outlet. In the age of social media, pop culture awareness and discussion is a self-running machine, but the more parts added into the mix, the more diverse, and prolific it becomes.

Perhaps most unique to Jurassic, is the outlet for creative growth in the education sector. While the dinosaurs of Jurassic World are different from their real world namesakes, these differences can be fully embraced while collaborating with STEM partners to expand dinosaur knowledge. If Jurassic began partnering with the science community to expand real world dinosaur information in ways they cannot typically achieve alone, paleontologists, schools, museums, and other similar outlets will embrace the brand with open arms. Be it reinstating a website like Jurassic Park Institute, sharing news from Paleontological discoveries, or even sponsoring or curating dino-education TV or web programs such as documentaries, Jurassic would only further strengthen brand awareness while achieving a genuinely positive impact.

The future for our very own Jurassic World is a vast expanse of endless opportunity of innovation and entertainment, fueling engagement across multiple platforms. My hope is new programs are continuously implemented to keep this momentum moving forward – spare no expense, and let dinosaurs rule the earth.

Source: NPD Group (via Jedi Temple Archives)


Comprehensive Visual Guide to Every Jurassic World & Park Dinosaur

The Jurassic Park franchise is home to numerous different dinosaurs species, existing both on screen or simply by name references. The following is a researched canonical guide to the dinosaurs confirmed to exist within the film universe, attempting to identify them by their various species and subspecies, while providing any additional supplementing information such as sex, or film appearance.

Some dinosaurs in the Jurassic franchise showcase prominent sexual dimorphism, creating a visual variation between the males and females of the same species. This guide indicates (m), (f), or (m/f) depending on the sex shown for the animal. If there is no evidence of variation, it is assumed both look the same and there will be no labeling of the animals sex.

Further, some dinosaurs look distinctly different from film to film. These are assumed to be different cloning variations creating distinct subspecies, and are indicated with v#’s once past their initial debut. Single version dinosaurs are not marked with a v# – the distinction is only marked from v#2 and beyond.

Of note, this list includes “prototype genome” dinosaurs. These are the taxidermy dinosaurs on display at Benjamin Lockwood’s estate as seen in Fallen Kingdom. Not much is known about these animals other than they were created in the early years of Jurassic Park, and likely were incomplete genetically, causing failed life cycles and continued research.

Finally, some dinosaurs are mentioned by name only, (such as being listed on park brochures or DNA vials). While some of these dinosaurs later appeared in other films, many did not. Dinosaurs without visual representation will utilize visual information such as toys in place of canonical designs. With that in mind, only dinosaur species mentioned in the films and direct film materials will be acknowledged, and this does not pull from species listed within viral or behind the scenes materials only.

To finalize information in this list, behind the scenes materials were referenced for existing on screen dinosaurs, as were interviews with the filmmakers discussing them. The troves of information available as well as treating the films as a field research assignment is what identified dinosaur sex, subspecies determination, and more.

This guide is only to provide basic information for identifying the species, and does not include the in depth animal profiles which will be available at a later time.

Velociraptor V.1 (m/f)

  • Carnivore – Dromaeosaur
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park, The Lost World
  • Status: Unknown
  • Range: Isla Nublar and Sorna
  • Females present in a semi-uniform color, males with more distinct tiger striping.
  • Velociraptor V.2 (m/f)

  • Carnivore – Dromaeosaur
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park 3
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Sorna
  • Females are a more uniform beige and charcoal color with yellow eyes, red surrounding the socket, males darker with milky lateral stripes, quills on their head, red crests and eyes, and blue surrounding the eye
  • Velociraptor I.B.R.I.S. (V.1.5) (f)

  • Carnivore – Dromaeosaur
  • Status: Survived by Blue only
  • Range: Isla Nublar
  • The ‘raptor squad’ raised by Owen Grady, these custom engineered raptors were designed to obey command. Blue, Charlie, Delta, Echo, and Subject V-2 are the only known examples of this subspecies. Learn more here.
  • Tyrannosaurus Rex (m/f)

  • Carnivore – Tyrannosaurid
  • Status: At least one surviving female known (“Rexy/Roberta”)
  • Range: Isla Nublar and Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park, The Lost World, Jurassic Park 3, Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • Females present in variations of brown coloration; males have more robust skulls and green colored skin.
  • Teratophoneus

  • Carnivore – Tyrannosaurid
  • Status: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (skeletons only)
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Dilophosaurus

  • Carnivore – Dilophosaurid
  • Status: Unknown
  • Range: Isla Nublar and Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park, The Lost World (dino display), Jurassic World (Hologram), Fallen Kingdom (sound)
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Compsognathus

  • Carnivore – Compsognathid
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Sorna and Nublar
  • Seen in: The Lost World, Jurassic Park 3, Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism however subtle variation of color between individuals has been observed
  • Spinosaurus

  • Carnivore – Spinosaurid
  • Status: Unknown/disputed
  • Range: Isla Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park 3
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Note: it’s reported the skeleton on main street belongs to the one seen in JP3, however the skull structure is entirely different
  • Ceratosaurus

  • Carnivore – Ceratosaurid
  • Status: Unknown/reported extinct
  • Range: Isla Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park 3
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Allosaurus

  • Carnivore – Allosaurid
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Baryonyx

  • Carnivore – Spinosaurid
  • Status: Survived Sibo Eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom, mentioned to have existed prior by name only in Jurassic Park and JP3
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Suchomimus

  • Carnivore – Spinosaurid
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park 3 and Jurassic World by name only
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Carnotaurus

  • Carnivore – Abelisaurid
  • Status: Survived Sibo Eruption
  • Known Range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Metriacanthosaurus

  • Carnivore – Metriacanthosaurid
  • Status: Unknown/reported extinct
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park & Jurassic World by name only
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Herrerasaurus

  • Carnivore – Herrerasaurid
  • Status: Unknown/reported extinct
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park by name only
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Segisaurus

  • Carnivore – Coelophysid
  • Status: Unknown/reported extinct
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park by name only
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Proceratosaurus

  • Carnivore – Tyrannosaurid
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park by name only
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Dimorphodon

  • Carnivore – Pterosaur
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic World
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Pteranodon V.1 (“Geosternbergia”)

  • Omnivore/unknown – Pterosaur
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Sorna
  • Seen in: The Lost World
  • Note: Aviary mentioned in Jurassic Park with Pteranodons – potentially existed on Isla Nublar
  • Sexual dimorphism disputed; possible Geosternbergia crest variation (only seen on early unused production materials and Roland Tembos dino guide). The animal seen in the film features a more typical Pteranodon crest which muddies the exact genus it belongs to or if the other flatter crest is canonical.
  • Pteranodon V.2 (m/f)

  • Carnivore – Pterosaur
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park 3
  • Females are brown and tan, males are dark blue with yellow crests – males were designed but cut from film
  • Pterandon V.3

  • Carnivore – Pterosaur
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • Alternate crest color variants exist (norm being red), potential sexual dimorphism
  • Mosasaurus (f)

  • Carnivore – Mosasaur
  • Status: Escaped Isla Nublar, alive
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism, one animal only
  • Indominus Rex (hybrid) (f)

  • Carnivore – N/A
  • Status: extinct
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom (skeleton only)
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Indoraptor (hybrid) (m)

  • Carnivore – N/A
  • Status: extinct
  • Known range: Lockwood Manor California
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Concavenator (Prototype)

  • Carnivore – Allosaurid
  • Status: Unknown/prototype genome
  • Known range: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (taxidermy display)
  • No known sexual dimorphism, no known final genome
  • Mononykus (Prototype)

  • Carnivore – Maniraptora
  • Status: Unknown/prototype genome
  • Known range: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (taxidermy display)
  • No known sexual dimorphism, no known final genome
  • Note: this is the only known true feathered Jurassic Park dinosaur
  • Dilophosaurus (Prototype)

  • Carnivore – Dilophosaurid
  • Status: Unknown/prototype genome
  • Known range: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (taxidermy display)
  • No known sexual dimorphism, led to at least one final genome
  • Velociraptor (Prototype)

  • Carnivore – Dromaeosaur
  • Status: Unknown/prototype genome
  • Known range: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (taxidermy display)
  • No known sexual dimorphism, led to at least three different final genomes
  • Note: Appears to be direct decedent to V1 Raptors, share similarities to males minus stripes and skewing more orange
  • Dimetrodon (Prototype)

  • Carnivore – Synapsid
  • Status: Unknown/prototype genome
  • Known range: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (taxidermy display)
  • No known sexual dimorphism, no known final genome
  • Brachiosaurus V.1 (m/f)

  • Herbivore – Sauropod
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park, Fallen Kingdom
  • Subjects seen in Fallen Kingdom are smaller and stumpier, presenting subtle iridescent green skin around the face and neck. This is believed to be distinctive of male sexual dimorphism.
  • Brachiosaurus V.2 (m/f)

  • Herbivore – Sauropod
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park 3
  • Males and females are both variations of green, but males present notable red patches of skin on their face and atop their skull
  • Mamenchisaurus

  • Herbivore – Sauropod
  • Status: Unknown/reported extinct
  • Known range: Isla Sorna
  • Seen in: The Lost World
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Apatosaurus

  • Herbivore – Sauropod
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Dreadnoughtus

  • Herbivore – Sauropod
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (DNA vials only – sold to Russians)
  • No known sexual dimorphism nor any evidence of living specimens
  • Gallimimus

  • Herbivore – Ornithomimosaur
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar and Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park, The Lost World, Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Parasaurolophus (m/f)

  • Herbivore – Hadrosaur
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar and Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park, The Lost World, Jurassic Park 3, Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • Males are light brown colors with lateral stripes; females feature similar patterns but green in coloration
  • Edmontosaurus

  • Herbivore – Hadrosaur
  • Status: Unknown/reported extinct
  • Known range: Isla Sorna & Nublar
  • Seen in: The Lost World (skeleton only), Jurassic World (name only)
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Corythosaurus

  • Herbivore – Hadrosaur
  • Status: Unknown/reported extinct
  • Known range: Isla Sorna
  • Seen in: The Lost World (name only), Jurassic Park 3
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Triceratops (m/f)

  • Herbivore – Ceratopsian
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar and Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park, The Lost World, Jurassic Park 3, Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • Females are a tortoiseshell coloration of greys and slight brown and have more prominent large rounded scutes and scales over their body; males are more solid greys and brown with subtle variations of blue on the face. Adult Triceratops presenting light vertical stripes on their back has been observed on Isla Sorna.
  • Sinoceratops

  • Herbivore – Ceratopsian
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual Dimorphism
  • Microceratus

  • Herbivore – Ceratopsian
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Nublar & Sorna
  • Seen in: Jurassic World (name only)
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Ankylosaurus (m/f)

  • Herbivore – Ankylosaur
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Seen in: Jurassic Park 3, Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • Males features red on face, darker armor, and distinct body shape; females are more uniform grey and brown colors
  • Peloroplites

  • Herbivore – Ankylosaur
  • Status: Unknown/reported extinct
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (skeletons only)
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Stegosaurus V.1

  • Herbivore – Stegosaurid
  • Status: Unknown
  • Known range: Isla Sorna, possibly Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: The Lost World, Jurassic Park 3, mentioned in Jurassic Park by name only
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Stegosaurus V.2

  • Herbivore – Stegosaurid
  • Status: Survived Sibo erupton
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Jurassic World, Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Pachycephalosaurus

  • Herbivore – Pachycephalosaurid
  • Status: unknown
  • Known range: Isla Sorna and Nublar
  • Seen in: The Lost World, Jurassic World
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Stygimoloch

  • Herbivore – Pachycephalosaurid
  • Status: Survived Sibo eruption
  • Known range: Isla Nublar
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Stegoceratops (hybrid)

  • Herbivore – N/A
  • Status: disputed
  • Known range: Isla Nublar/disputed
  • Seen in: Jurassic World (computer display only – actual existence disputed)
  • No known sexual dimorphism
  • Diplodocus (Protoype)

  • Herbivore – Sauropod
  • Status: Unknown/prototype genome
  • Known range: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (taxidermy display)
  • No known sexual dimorphism, no known final genome
  • Note: specimens on display appear to be juveniles
  • Dracorex (prototype)

  • Herbivore – Pachycephalosaurid
  • Status: Unknown/prototype genome
  • Known range: Unknown
  • Seen in: Fallen Kingdom (taxidermy display)
  • No known sexual dimorphism, no known final genome
  • Note: videogame design not indicative of film design
  • Canon Deep Dive: The Three Subspecies of Velociraptor in Jurassic World and Where to Find Them

    Velociraptor is a species that needs no introduction to Jurassic fans, its identity seared into our imaginations as the ultimate apex predator birthed from InGens labs. However, as prominent as the species of dinosaur is in the Jurassic Park films, it is often shrouded in mystery, and defined by complex behavioral traits.

    During the Hammond era at least one distinct subspecies of Velociraptor was created, and went on to thrive on Isla Nublar & Sorna after the fall of the park. In the Masrani era, a new Velociraptor program was spawned, and it eventually gave birth to many animals, though only four have been featured in the films. The distinctive V.2 subspecies of Velociraptor as seen in Jurassic Park 3’s origin remains undetermined, and could have been created in either era.

    The aim of this article is to take an in-universe look at and identify the many subspecies of Jurassic World Velociraptor, and even attempt to discern what’s left living post the Sibo eruption.

    About


    V.2 male and female Velociraptors

    The Velociraptor of fossil record was a species of dinosauria that lived roughly 75 to 71 million years ago during the latter part of the Cretaceous Period, in and around Mongolia. It was one the first species to be revived by InGen in 1986 through their De-extinction process [Note: Masrani Global initially reported it was the first – their records later changed to say Triceratops was]. They were planned to be exhibited at Jurassic Park before its abandonment but were later revived for Project I.B.R.I.S. as part of a research program to test their intelligence for real-world applications.

    It’s theorized due to drastic physical differences, InGen’s Velociraptor is misidentified, and cloned not from its namesake but rather Deinonychus or Utahraptor.

    There are three distinct variations of Velociraptor which were cloned by InGen, not counting the sexual dimorphism seen within each individual version. However, despite the surface level variations, each sub-species remains relatively similar in terms of physical attributes. Each species is roughly 6 feet tall, 13 feet long and weigh over 350llbs. They’re each covered in taut, leathery skin not unlike that of a Komodo Dragons, with degrees and variation seen between subset and sexes.

    Notably, they feature a 6 inch retractable sickle “killing claw” on the inner toes of each foot, which is one of the animals most signature deadly weapons. While the skull structure varies between each subset, they all feature a pronounced orbital socket with distinct antorbital fenestra ridges. Much like many modern reptiles, these animals mouths were lined with a strong lip structure.


    V.1 female Velociraptor

    Agile and remarkably strong, Velociraptors are incredible jumpers and can reach speeds of up to 50-60mph in the open.

    However, the Velociraptor’s most remarkable attribute is their intelligence and social structure. Purportedly the second most intelligent species on the planet (after mankind), Velociraptor intelligence surpasses that of Chimpanzees and Dolphins. While incredibly aggressive, they are also very social animals with a complex pack dynamic. Like an inverse of a pride of lions, Velociraptors are typically observed with one or a few females leading the pack, with males making up the majority of the population.

    Velociraptors typically stay near their nest, and venture out further to hunt – though they have been observed leaving their territory if they still perceive previous intruders as a threat. Velociraptors are particularly defensive of their nests and eggs. The position of ‘Alpha’ within the pack is a very important part of their dynamic, and is typically respected. However, the animals have been known to fight amongst themselves to earn that spot – and those fights can often prove deadly.

    Each of the three raptor variations seemingly share the same ‘language’, displaying a complex and unique series of screeches, barks, growls and hisses. Further communication methods include general body language, and the tapping of their killing claws.

    Velociraptor Version 1.0

    This subset of Velociraptor is not only the first version of raptor cloned by InGen, but also one of the first ever successful dinosaur species brought back via ‘De-extinction’ in 1986. Version 1.0 is known to exist natively with breeding populations on both Isla Nublar and Isla Sorna.

    Both the males and females have piercing, veiny eyes with vertical pupils and nearly identical physical builds. The largest difference between each sex is colour of their skin and eyes.

  • Female
  • All dinosaurs created for Jurassic Park by InGen were intended to be female, and as such these were the Velociraptor [initially] housed within Isla Nublar.

    The female Velocirapors sport green eyes, with skin that is primarily a muted orangeish brown, with darker brown horizontal speckling and splotching overtop. Their underbelly is a lighter beige color, which transitions to the darker hues the higher it goes up the body.

    The females have very little distinct striping or spotting, and can appear rather uniform in color, resembling gunmetal green until closer, well lit inspection.

    Female V.1 Velociraptors can also be found on Isla Sorna, but they are fewer in each pack than male.

  • Male
  • Natural born male V.1 raptors sport bright yellow eyes with skin more vibrant orange than their female counterparts, and a beige underbelly with less dark splotching overall. They’re easily distinguished from the female packmates as they are covered in vertical dark brown stripes, not entirely unlike that seen in Bengal Tigers.

    When a sex change occurs within the dinosaur population, it remains unclear if their physical coloration changes to match. As Velociraptors were breeding in Jurassic Park, but only the female attributes were observed, it stands to reason only those born male sport the coloration listed above.

    Like their female counterparts, the male v.1 raptors can be found on Sorna, making up the majority of the pack.

    Version 2.0

    The second distinct subset of Velociraptor cloned by InGen, its creation date remains shrouded in mystery. First and only observed on Isla Sorna in 2001, it is wholly possible this subset of raptor was not bred until after Masrani Global took ownership of InGen in 1998. Without further information solidifying this subspecies origins, it remains undetermined.

    The male and female v.2 raptors are much more distinct from one another than their V.1 counterparts, with physical variation ranging from skull shape to colors. Both are made distinct from their v.1 cousins with a more narrow skull, and more pronounced ridge running from the eye socket and tapering prior to the nares, raised above the antorbital fenestra.

  • Female
  • The female V.2 raptors feature bright yellow eyes, with small round pupils. The eye socket is surrounded with a splash of vivid blood red skin, only seen elsewhere around their toes. Their skin is a semi-uniform cream color, with irregular charcoal brown covering its back from skull to tail, following the spine. From the spine there are occasional roughly defined vertical stripes, only slightly extending downward. From their ribs and hips below, small irregular horizontal striping occurs in blotchy patterns, also in the charcoal brown color.

    The females are the clearly alphas of their packs, with only one observed in Jurassic Park 3 commanding a pack of males in their effort to retrieve stolen eggs. They seem to be more cunning than their male counterparts, and more reserved with their actions than their V.1 cousins, less prone to violent outbursts.

  • Male
  • The male V.2 are immediately distinguished by their darker colors, horizontal milky stripe on either side running from skull to tail, striking red eyes with round pupils, and quill like proto-feathers protruding from the rear of their skull. Their skin is primarly a muted fleshy purple, molted with charcoal grey splotching of a similar tone. Their eye sockets are surrounded by vibrant blue skin, and the antorbital fenestra ridge highlighted by a brighter red color – this red can also be seen atop their skull, and around their fingers. Their underbelly is a yellow cream color that is occasionally interjected by the darker grey splotches.

    The males of the pack are often the front line offense, following the command of the alpha female to track down intruders and/or hunt prey. They’re more prone to impulsive outbursts, but have not been observed infighting like their V.1 cousins. Incredibly social, these animals are intelligent and cunning predators that will protect their pack at great lengths.

    The male V.2 raptors are the only Jurassic dinosaurs observed sporting proto-feathers, other than the two hybrids Indominus Rex and Indoraptor.

    I.B.R.I.S. (V1.5)

    I.B.R.S. Velociraptors are in reality the third acknowledged subset of Velociraptor created by InGen 2012. Based upon the V.1 genome (thus V.1.5 labeling), these raptors were custom crafted by Dr. Henry WU for the Integrated Behavioral Raptor Intelligence Study program run by Owen Grady. Each v.1.5 Velociraptor has been programmed with unique, customized DNA.

    Very similar in build and looks to the v.1.0 Velociraptors, v.1.5 are most easily identified by their unique color schemes. Further, they have thicker, more flexible rubbery skin, featuring more visible fleshy tones. Their eyes are yellow-orange with vertical pupils much like v.1.0, however are more translucent and do not have the noteworthy visible vein structures seen in their counterparts.

    While roughly the same size and shape as their v.1.0 predecessors, they are notably stockier with other various differences. There are 4 different V.1.5 raptors, each with their own genetic, physical, and behavioral discrepancies.

    All of the ‘raptor squad’ V.1.5 raptors were bred female, and were born at similar times.

  • Blue
  • Blue is a uniquely modified V.1.5 Velociraptor, infused with DNA from a Black-Throated African Monitor Lizard. She was bred as part of InGen’s Project I.B.R.I.S. and is the sole surviving member, following the Jurassic World incident in December 2015. Blue is the largest and stockiest raptor of the I.B.R.I.S. pack, easily identified by her scute covered face and striking blue stripe.

    Blue’s face is similar in shape to V.1.0 raptors, but is wider with a over sloping rear orbital socket crest and a small ridge running down the top middle of her skull. Her nasal cavities are more forward facing and pronounced due to the additional width of her skull. Her unique scute coverage is most pronounced on her orbital ridge, lower jaw hinge, top rear of the skull, and run down the back and sides of her neck. Her body shape is very close to that of the V.1.0 raptors, but stockier with a less pronounced muscle and skeletal structure.

    Blue’s color consists mainly of greys and desaturated fleshy tones, with inconsistent splotches of darker greys highlighting the top of her scales. Her most notable color feature is her asymmetrical lateral stripe which starts at each eye, and runs down the the sides of her body. The stripes are almost black dark blue color, which have a iridescent sheen that gives off a lighter blue appearance. Each stripe is highlighted with white at its edges, making it stand out even more.

    Blue is the Alpha of her pack, and was a uniquely thoughtful and empathetic animal since birth. These traits allowed her to not only take command of the pack of her peers, but to work with Owen, trusting him, and extending her familial circle to include him. These unique traits are hardwired into her DNA and are not currently present in any other Velociraptor, living or dead.

  • Charlie (deceased)
  • Charlie is a uniquely modified V.1.5 Velociraptor, infused with DNA from a Green Iguana. She was bred as part of InGen’s Project I.B.R.I.S. and was the first ‘Raptor Squad’ casualty during the Jurassic World incident in December 2015.

    Charlie is a slimmer member of the raptor pack, identifiable by her light green color with dark green vertical stripes.

    Charlies’s skull structure is most similar to Delta featuring the raised ridge on her snout, but is slightly wider like her other V.1.5 sisters. Her nasal cavities are more forward facing and pronounced due to the additional width of her skull. Like her peers, her body shape is very close to that of the V.1.0 raptors, but slightly stockier with a less pronounced muscle and skeletal structure.

    Charlie’s color mainly consists of hues of light grass and asparagus greens with a cream underbelly, and dark vertical stripes. The stripes are a dark jade green with thin light cream highlights, starting at the base of the skull and neck, running the length of her body and tail.

    The youngest member of the raptor pack, Charlie was the final V.1.5 I.B.R.I.S. raptor born sometime after 2012. Charlie is the least seasoned of the pack, and youthfully inconsistent and unpredictable with her actions. However, Charlie was deeply loyal to Blue, constantly looked to her for leadership, and has been known to even give up her food for her. As such, Charlie also looks to Owen for guidance, but is confused over his place in the pack.

    Charlie, often chipper and overly enthusiastic, would accidentally smack other members of the pack with her tail causing frustration amongst her peers.

  • Delta (deceased)
  • Delta is a uniquely modified V.1.5 Velociraptor, infused with the most Avian DNA out of the pack. She was bred as part of InGen’s Project I.B.R.I.S. and was the second ‘Raptor Squad’ casualty during the Jurassic World incident in December 2015.

    Delta is identifiable by her darker green color, and pronounced antorbital fenestra ridges not unlike those seen in V.2.0 males.

    Her skull structure is similar to V.1.0 raptors, but is slightly wider and with more defined crests between her nasal cavities and eye sockets akin to V2 Raptors. Her nostrils are more forward facing and pronounced due to the additional width of her skull. Like her peers, her body shape is very close to that of the V.1.0 raptors, though more lean than Blue.

    Deltas’s color is darker than Charlies, mainly consisting of mostly jade and some rainforest green hues leading to a fern green underbelly. Her skin is darkest on the top of her body, and sides of her arms and legs. Unlike Charlie, she does not have any prominent striping, but has distinguished teal coloration around her eyes.

    There were some reports that Delta had unique eyes, with Gecko like pupils – however, evidence suggests otherwise as her eyes look the same as her packmates.

    The second eldest member of the raptor pack, Delta was born sometime after 2012. Always loyal to Blue, she often led coordinated attacks pushing prey into ambushes. Delta was incredibly intelligent, with thoughtful birdlike behavior and quick movements. While loyal to her Alpha, she was a proficient hunter and capable of strong independent decision making.

  • Echo (deceased)
  • Echo was a V.1.5 Velociraptor who’s unique DNA attributes were not cataloged. She was bred as part of InGen’s Project I.B.R.I.S. and was the final ‘Raptor Squad’ casualty during the Jurassic World incident in December 2015.

    Echo is similar in build to Charlie, and shares the most similarities to V.1.0 raptors out of the pack.

    Echo’s skull structure is most similar to the V.1.0 raptors, but is slightly wider like her other V.1.5 sisters. Her nostrils are more forward facing and pronounced due to the additional width of her skull. Like her peers, her body shape is very close to that of the V.1.0 raptors, yet less defined.

    Her fleshy pink facial scar retained from fighting with Blue gives her a unique sneer, earning the nickname ‘Elvis’ from paddock workers.

    Echo appears orangeish brown in color, with a cream underbelly, and dark vertical stripes similar to Charlies. Her stripes are a dark blue and black in coloration, with an iridescent blue sheen. Less defined than Charlies stripes, hers are met with dark splotching abroad, blending more naturally with the orange hue below.

    The second youngest member of the raptor pack, Echo was bred into the V.1.5 I.B.R.I.S. program sometime after 2012. Echo is the least obedient of the pack, and can often act selfishly despite her acceptance of Blue’s leadership. She often will not wait for commands, and attack, hunt and eat food when the opportunity presents itself.

    Her stubborn independence, and reluctance to follow leadership led to her challenging Blue for command of the pack. Blue did not kill echo, but did leave her with permanent scars across her face. After that, Echo no longer challenged leadership but still acted in her own interest at times.

  • Rejected specimens
  • The I.B.R.I.S. project saw many attempts at breeding raptors prior to success, and while InGen successfully created unique Velociraptors, the subjects were rejected from the program due to aberrant and aggressive behavior.

    One such animal was subject V-2, and early V.1.5 raptor who was rejected due to her aggressive behavior, as evidenced by her scars on her mouth. Her look is near identical to that of female V.1 raptors, only with slight color variation including vibrant light blue skin interweaving more prominent padding. It’s been presumed V-2 was euthanized, however that seems to go against Owen Grady and Masrani’s ethical code, and it’s possible she was relocated on Nublar, Sorna, or somewhere else entirely.

    Hunting

    Velociraptors are pack hunters, and often work to surround and ambush their prey, taking them by surprise. Numerous hunting patterns have been observed, from the coordinated ambush in the long grass as seen during the 1997 Sorna incident, to the distract and flanking maneuver executed to kill Robert Muldoon on Isla Nublar in 93.

    Velociraptors rely on their quick, quiet, and athletic maneuverability to get close to their prey before pouncing, gripping their preys face or neck with their mouth, and latching on to their chest and belly with their talons, tearing with their deadly sickle claws. Once Velociraptors have their prey in their sights, they will stop at nothing to hunt them down (even losing their organized hunting patterns), tracking them over treacherous terrain, and following them into hard to navigate structure when needed.

    null

    The eating habits of Velociraptor once making a successful kill have not been observed, though it’s likely they share the meals with numerous members of the pack by established hierarchy. Carcasses of prey and remains of uneaten food have not been observed by Velociraptor nests, suggesting they feed on the field, not bringing the meals back to their territory as not to attract other predatorial animals to where their young are situated. As such, adult Velociraptors may even regurgitate food like modern birds to feed their babies, though this remains entirely speculative.

    Nests and Breeding

    Velociraptors are territorial animals, who establish nests rarely left out of sight. As they congregate in large packs, their nests often contain numerous broods of young from multiple parents, arranged on the ground in circular clutches. The entire pack is dedicated to caring for the young, as led by the alpha females.

    Both V.1 and V.2 Velociraptors have been observed with nests in the wild on Nublar and Sorna respectively. Dr. Alan Grant made the discovery that the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park were capable of changing sex and breeding when he discovered the semi-recently hatched Velociraptor nest at the foot of large trees on Nublar. These distinct oval shaped eggs were surrounded by the the unique two toed pad prints caused by the raptors walking with their killing claw raised.

    The V.2 egg nests are slightly more defined, housed in raised rounded mud mounds, surround by soft foliage such as grass. Multiple clutches were kept near one another, and while the nest was left alone long enough for humans to encroach on its territory and steal two eggs, raptors clearly observed the theft and took great pains to safely return the eggs home once tracked down.

    The mating patterns of Velociraptor have yet to be observed, though there is likely some form of hierarchy which determines which males can mate with whom, as observed in many modern animals. This is further evidenced by the males sporting more vibrant colors, likely to attract their mates, while the females sport more practical colors for camouflage.

    Whether or not crossbreeding can occur between the different subspecies has yet to be determined, though it stands to reason that their DNA is close enough to allow mating between the clans. Whether or not this has actually occurred, or what these naturally occurring hybrid animals would look like remains unknown. As Isla Sorna has not been seen since 2001, nor its wild dinosaur populations, it is very possible a new version of raptor now exists from the two subspecies fighting, interacting and even mating over time.


    Raptor tribes collide in this fan art by Raph Lomotan

    Survivors?

    The status of the Velociraptors post the 2018 Mt. Sibo eruptions remains uncertain. Reports released by the Dinosaur Protection Group suggest Isla Sorna is abandoned, without any animals left on the island. I however remain unconvinced by the veracity of that report, as similar reports released by the DPG had easily refutable discrepancies. This seems to be the case of shoddy record keeping by Ingen, and even more likely, the company being misleading about their assets for liability purposes.

    It seems entirely unlikely that no dinosaurs remain on Isla Sorna, even if their populations had been effected by relocation, poaching, and famine. Further, it is entirely possible animals were illegally relocated off island prior to the Lockwood incident of Nublar, including members of the various wild raptor populations.

    Finally, while Blue was the last remaining Velociraptor on Isla Nublar belonging to the I.B.R.I.S. tribe, it was never confirmed she was the only raptor on that island. As we know wild raptors were breeding on the island during and after the fall of Jurassic Park, it is very possible remnants persisted in the restricted zone even after Jurassic World was constructed. When the volcanic eruption of Mt. Sibo caused cataclysmic damage to Nublar in 2018, that damage seemed to be reserved for the northern half of the island. While the living conditions may be dire, it is entirely possible populations of dinosaur persisted on Nublar post that new extinction level event.

    Blue may be the only known Velociraptor persisting at this time, roaming Northern California, but it’s likely she has other packmates waiting to be discovered elsewhere in the world.

    After all, life finds a way.


    Colin Trevorrow interview: How Whitney and Vance evolved into Claire and Owen in Jurassic World

    Colin Trevorrow, who wrote and directed Jurassic World and wrote Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom spoke to BDH Network in an exclusive interview in regards to Bryce Dallas Howard and her character Claire Dearing in the Jurassic World films. He talked about the process of evolving the female lead character from the original Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver script, the process of hiring Bryce for the role, how Claire got her name and even touched on what we can expect from Claire in Jurassic World 3, among other topics.

    The very first question posed to Colin was about what the female lead character was like in the Jurassic Park 4 script that Universal Pictures had originally green-lighted for a June 2014 release. The original script was co-written by husband and wife writers Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver before Colin was even hired to direct the fourth installment of the franchise. Colin and writing partner Derek Connolly rewrote the script from scratch while incorporating some important story elements that Steven Spielberg had requested, such as an operational park. The movie was delayed one year to a June 2015 release to allow proper time to prepare for the finalized script and story. But had the Jaffa and Silver script been filmed, our leads would not have been Claire and Owen, but instead Whitney and Vance. It also seems like the idea of “training raptors” would have been taken a lot further than what we get on screen in Jurassic World or even Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.

    The lead character was a guy called Vance, who ultimately became Owen in our story. The film opened with Vance jumping out of a helicopter with a pack of raptors on a military raid of a drug dealer’s compound in Colombia. It was a different approach. But there was a character who had one or two scenes, the manager for the corporate side of the park. I think her name was Whitney. She was an antagonist to the hero, putting up red tape.

    Colin goes on in the interview to describe the process of how casting director, John Papsidera, set up a Skype call between him and Bryce to discuss her joining the film. Also elaborating the relationship she had with Spielberg and that she was already part of the “Amblin Family”. Spielberg himself was also confident that she could “create this specific character better than anyone”.

    As for how Claire Dearing got her name it turns out it was a bit of a group effort with Colin choosing “Claire” and Derek choosing “Dearing”. Colin felt the name of Claire was warm and loving and Derek chose Dearing as a reference to her character being very endearing.

    I chose Claire, it felt hard on the surface but ultimately warm and loving. Derek chose Dearing, which is a very Derek thing to do. He loves those Dickensian names that suggest a bit about the character, push the viewer in the direction the author wants them to go. She may seem sharp-edged at first, but ultimately she’s very endearing.

    Of course no one should be surprised that the characters of Claire and Owen will be returning for the final installment in the trilogy, which is set to hit theaters on June 11, 2021. Colin and newcomer Emily Carmichael are working on the script as we speak based on a story Colin created with Derek Connolly. While Colin couldn’t share much on the sixth installment of the franchise, he did reiterate that Claire and Owen will have a lot on their plate now that dinosaurs are loose on the mainland and that other dinosaurs and DNA samples were sold or moved to other parts of the world.

    She and Owen will have bigger conflicts at hand, with shared responsibilities and a shared need for redemption. That’s a compelling story I’m excited to tell.

    To see the full answers Colin had for the questions featured here and other intriguing questions about Bryce and her character Claire, please visit BDH Network and view their visit digital magazine. Also, please let us know your thoughts in the comments below and on our forums.

    Source: BDH Network

    Legendary Entertainment May Not Be Involved with Jurassic World 3

    Legendary Entertainment is leaving Universal Pictures faster than Arcadia left Isla Nublar in Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. In 2013 Legendary signed a 5 year co-financing contract with Universal, and while that deal technically doesn’t end until December 31st of this year, Legendary is set to re-join their former distribution partner Warner Brothers.

    Universal had long been expected not to renew the contact with Legendary and today’s development is further proof of that. The Detective Pikachu film that is being created by Legendary was set to be marketed and distributed worldwide by Universal in 2019, but will now shift to Warner Brothers with the expiring deal. It is also likely that Legendary will no longer be involved with the Jurassic World films and likely will not be attached to 2021’s Jurassic World 3 (not it’s final title). It has not been officially confirmed yet, but it is most likely the case with the expiring deal.

    “The Universal-Legendary relationship had sputtered over the past year, culminating with Legendary’s Dwayne Johnson starrer Skyscraper, which sources say will ultimately be a money loser. Legendary also has put up large chunks of the budget for most of the films in Universal’s slate over the past four years, including summer hit Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, which has earned $1.2 billion to date. Legendary has a stake in BlacKkKlansman, a film from Universal’s Focus Features label. That would mark its final film with Universal.”

    During the deal with Legendary, the studio helped finance portions of the budgets for 2015’s Jurassic World and this year’s Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Jurassic World exploded at the box office with $1.671 billion and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is currently at $1.204 billion, and that number continues to grow daily. Unadjusted for inflation, the Jurassic World films are the biggest films that Legendary has even been attached to.

    Legendary is currently heavily pushing their “MonsterVerse” which features iconic cinematic creatures such as King Kong and Godzilla. But even the first two installments, 2014’s Godzilla and 2017’s Kong: Skull Island, combined worldwide ($1.095 billion) is less than what either Jurassic World or Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom did on their own. Granted though, both MonsterVerse movies are box office successes and made a profit, just not to the massive levels of the Jurassic films.

    But even with Legendary helping to cover the costs of those films, things were not always sunny between the two studios. It had been reported that Universal had become annoyed with Legendary, specifically with former chairman and CEO Thomas Tull, who tried to take more credit for the success of Jurassic World than they had earned. Legendary only helped co-finance the Jurassic films and had no creative input on the films themselves or their marketing.

    Several sources say there has been strain, in part because Tull kicked off the deal in 2014 with a couple of clunkers that he put through Universal’s distribution system and then upset some at the studio who feel he has indulged a bad habit of wrapping himself in credit for hits that he merely helped finance. In this case, the film at issue was the biggest movie of the year to date, Jurassic World.

    Jurassic World 3 appears like it will be the first film in the Jurassic World trilogy that will not have the help of co-financing from Legendary, but that is nothing to be worried about for the film itself. Universal might cover the costs of the film themselves or may even partner up with another small studio for co-financing on the project. But as of right now only Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment are attached to the final film in the new trilogy.

    With Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom joining the rare billion dollar club, it is likely Universal will spare no expense on the budget and marketing costs for Jurassic World 3. With rumors of more of the classic Jurassic cast returning for the next installment, it wouldn’t be surprising if the budget approached or crossed $200 million. Jurassic World 3, which will be released on June 11, 2021 will be directed by Colin Trevorrow who is also writing the screenplay with franchise newcomer Emily Carmichael.

    Please let us know your thoughts in the comments below and on our forums.

    Source: The Hollywood Reporter

    Colin Trevorrow Teases a Jurassic Sized Reunion For Jurassic World 3

    If there is one thing the Jurassic franchise has drilled into our skulls, it’s that “life finds a way.” In 2021, Jurassic World 3 might just find a way to bring new life to some of our old favorite characters. In a recent interview with MTV, Colin Trevorrow hinted at a return of some classic characters like Alan Grant and Ellie Sattler.

    Trevorrow spoke a little about the return of Ian Malcolm in Fallen Kingdom, saying “We felt like this was [Ian] Malcolm’s return, this was his moment…let him have his moment.” He followed up with some comments on whether or not we would see appearance from other classic characters, explaining “I feel that way about everyone, especially Laura [Dern] in that she never got to have her own movie. That, I identified as being something that’s important. And this moment with Goldblum, because he had this very clear set of ethical questions that he was able to pose for everybody, we just wanted to put the spotlight on him [Goldblum].”

    It seems pretty clear that Trevorrow has strong feelings about the old characters, Dr. Sattler especially. When MTV asked him if he thought it would be unfair to fans if the original characters did not make some sort of return, he simply stated “I totally agree with that. I would feel robbed too, yeah.” With Jurassic World 3 still three years away, that is probably about as clear of a confirmation as we’re going to get. The video of the full interview can be seen below.

    While Dr. Sattler and Dr. Grant seem to be at the top of every fan’s list for a return to the franchise, another classic character has been popping up in the spotlight in some Jurassic circles. Ariana Richards, who played Lex Murphy in the original Jurassic Park, has been making the rounds lately. Richards attended the Hollywood premiere of Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom at the Walt Disney Concert Hall on June 12, 2018. She also was spotted raptor wrangling with the Blue animatronic and riding the Jurassic Park River Adventure ride at Universal Studios Hollywood. At this point, all we can do is speculate as to whether this is just coincidence, promotion for Fallen Kingdom, or a hint at the return of Lex Murphy. Richards, now 38, has a thriving art business so only time will tell if a return to the big screen is in the cards for her.

    What role do you think Lex could play in the world as it was left at the end of Fallen Kingdom? What other characters would you like to see return to Jurassic World 3? As always, sound off in the comments below.

    Source: MTV, Twitter, 

    Report: Cinematographer John Schwartzman returning for Jurassic World 3

    The website Omega Underground is reporting that Jurassic World Cinematographer John Schwartzman is returning in the same role for Jurassic World 3.

    With J.A. Bayona directing the second film in the new trilogy, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, he brought along Oscar Faura to be his cinematographer. But for the final film in the new trilogy, Colin Trevorrow is returning to the director’s chair and it makes sense he would turn back to someone he has prior experience with.

    In addition to Jurassic World, Schwartzman has worked on numerous other films including Saving Mr. Banks, Armageddon, The Book of Henry and Seabiscuit, which he was nominated for an Academy Award.

    Jurassic World 3 is slated to hit theaters on June 11, 2021.

    Thank you to Matt for the heads up on this report.

    Source: Omega Underground

    ‘Jurassic World 3’ Will Put the Focus Back on Real Dinosaurs Without Hybrid Creatures!

    While ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom‘ doesn’t release until a few more weeks from now, news about the third film of the trilogy keeps roaring in.

    In a recent issue of Total Film magazine cast and crew gave numerous interviews revealing much about the latest Jurassic Park sequel releasing this June. While speaking to Colin Trevorrow about the Indoraptor, a new hybrid creature that is custom designed to terrify audiences, Total Film asked about the status of hybrids in Jurassic World 3.

    Colin did not shy away from sharing the answer many have wanted to hear:

    [Colin Trevorrow promised] that the Indo will mark the last of the series’ hybrid beasts. “I’m looking forward to, in the third film, getting a little back into the Paleontological, wild animal, true dinosaur nature of all of it.”

    This news comes as welcome surprise, and I couldn’t be happier to hear it. While the Indominus Rex proved to be an entertaining creature with a great abelisaurid inspired design, and the Indoraptor looks intriguingly frightening, returning the focus to the real animals of the fossil record brings my interest back to a level it hasn’t been in ages. There was always something magical about knowing that the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park represented real, majestic animals of the past, albeit with some artistic liberty, and that is something the World films have strayed further away from.

    The Jurassic franchise is of course fictional, yet it is often a valuable tool for spreading paleontological information, and can be a fun learning and development aide in the scientific fields. This cross of potential ‘learning’ and entertainment is one of the Jurassic franchises many unique and valuable staples, as it offers a genuine abundance of fact alongside fiction. To better embrace this, keeping the animals and their behaviors provided as accurate as possible while still providing a fun cinematic journey will lead further momentum and ownership of this unique niche.

    Sauropods fighting by Paleoartist Mark Witton

    Paleontologists will be the first to remind you that the actual fossil record is teeming with untapped cinematic potential, and filmmakers just need to use their hammer and chisel to dig a little deeper to find the real world prehistoric animals needed to tell the stories they want. Something I have wanted to see join the Jurassic films would be a true quadrupedal carnivore (Postosuchus or Dimetrodon?) – it’s true that would mean a prehistoric reptile and not a dinosaur, yet that’s nothing new as we already have Pteranodons and the Mosasaurus, neither of which are dinosaurs.

    Circling back to the specific topic of Jurassic sequels, growing up one of the elements I looked most forward to in upcoming films was the mystery of ‘what new dinosaurs will they add this time?’. I’d often find myself deeply invested in dinosaur related media, looking for the perfect hypothetical prehistoric animal to chase, terrify, or awe the heroes on their upcoming journey. When Jurassic Park 3 introduced the Spinosaurus, it sparked a widespread new interest in that dinosaur, and of course, the debate of whether the real world animal really could kill a Tyrannosaurus Rex (they couldn’t).

    This was made extra magical as a child, when my imagination was overwhelmed with the excited daydreams of what life was like when dinosaurs ruled the earth, fueled further by those animals returning from extinction so realistically in the Jurassic films.

    This promised return to form for Jurassic World 3 isn’t alone, as recently Colin Trevorrow stated the film would return to Jurassic Park’s techno-thriller roots:

    “I would say Jurassic World was an action adventure, Fallen Kingdom is kind of a horror suspense film, and Jurassic World 3 will be a science thriller in the same way that Jurassic Park was.”

    One thing is for certain: everything about the final chapter of the Jurassic World trilogy is sounding great on paper. Jurassic World 3 is set to be released on June 11, 2021. In addition to directing the film, Colin Trevorrow will write the script with Emily Carmichael based off a story by Trevorrow and Derek Connolly.

    John Hammond’s dream realized in its purest form

    Are you excited about this promised return to form, with a focus on real world dinosaurs, and what dinosaurs do you hope to see JW3? Sound off in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned for the latest news!

    Source: Total Film Magazine – on sale now!