John Hammond Was Killed by Velociraptors in These Newly Unearthed Jurassic Park Storyboards

Although Jurassic Park is now over 26 years old, new stories, art, and secrets continue to be unearthed by its incredibly dedicated and passionate fanbase. This Jurassic June, Jurassic Time has uncovered yet another long-forgotten storyboard from the original Jurassic Park film. It is part of what Jurassic Time dubs as “The Many Deaths Of John Hammond”.

In this newly revealed storyboard page, John Hammond is in Jurassic Park’s control room during the climax when the Raptors have broken out of their pen and have entered the Visitor Center. John Hammond, with an incubator of eggs he plans to take with him upon leaving the park to “save it”, hears Lex screaming downstairs. He opens the door to the control room to help, but is greeted by a Raptor. Hammond falls backward, crashing on a tabletop model of Jurassic Park that is on display in the control room (which was to be very similar to the one we see in Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom), as the Raptor digs its claws deep into his chest. The incubator shatters to the floor, breaking one of the eggs while another remains unharmed.

Later on, Grant finds Hammond in the control room, barely alive, as he tells Grant that he always knew the “first batch of DNA was too unstable” and that he was looking forward to working with him at the park. He then dies as the two men are framed by the destroyed model of Jurassic Park. Then, the one unharmed egg from before cracks open, revealing an infant Triceratops.

This was one of the many deaths originally planned for John Hammond. In the novel, John Hammond dies while falling down a hill then killed by Compies. In Michael Crichton’s first draft of the screenplay, Hammond is in the Visitor Center when he falls into the destroyed scaffolding after being startled by the twitching corpse of a Raptor. Then, he is finished off by Compies like in the novel. Jurassic Time showed an illustration from this depiction some time ago.

This was then followed by Crichton’s final draft, which featured Hammond being killed by a Raptor while the “Welcome Video” of him is being played behind him, stuttering in an eerie effect as he is being attacked. The next version of his death is the one just described with the tabletop model; originating from a script revision actually tackled by someone else no one has ever known to have penned. But that is another story that will be told another time.

The other versions of his death are of Hammond simply being left behind on the island, either by his choice or by accident. Some art and storyboards of this idea were done by Art Director John Bell, with a version of this scripted in Malia Scotch Marmo’s screenplay that followed both Crichton’s and the one the tabletop Raptor death was from.

However, once David Koepp entered into the picture, it was decided Hammond no longer needed to die. Whether it was because Richard Attenborough was cast or the filmmakers decided it didn’t fit their ever-evolving take on the character remains to be seen. It seems to be a good choice for the version of the character they ended up crafting, but it will always be interesting to see just how his many deaths were once going to be played out.

You can find more rare art and storyboards from Jurassic Park at Jurassic Time, along with an audio memoir of John Hammond read by Richard Attenborough that was adapted from the Lost World game Trespasser. It includes a video version with art by Felipe Humboldt, as pictured above, who also has been uncovering many lost relics of the Jurassic Park films via Behind The Gates.

Huge thanks to to Derrick Davis for providing this article and his great work at Jurassic Time!


Never Before Seen Art Surfaces from Cancelled ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’ Animated Series!

We were planning on holding this one off until Jurassic June, but much like the dinosaurs of Isla Nublar, we simply couldn’t contain it. While you no doubt know there was an unreleased Jurassic Park animated series in the early 90’s, you probably did not know there was another in development alongside The Lost World. This attempt at bringing Jurassic Park into the animated front was kept under lock and key, without any substantial evidence of existence… until now.

Check out our video below, where dive into the art and story revealed from this elusive, never before seen unreleased Jurassic Park tie-in!

The Lost World’s animated series was commissioned by Steven Spielberg himself, and developed by DreamWorks Animation under the supervision of Steve Lyons. The artwork on display comes from Phillip J. Felix, who also contributed to the story of this ill-fated cartoon venture. Not much is known about the plot, outside of the fact that it would have introduced hybrid dinosaurs to the Jurassic Park franchise for the first time. While the cartoon was eventually shelved due to a variety of internal conflicts, many ideas were adopted by Kenner with the Jurassic Park Chaos Effect toy line (which was also to have a animated series that fell through).

The video above walks you through all the art available, what we know about the story and its titular DOOMSDAY REX, and how the idea of hybrids evolved forward into Jurassic World. Be sure to check it out!

While the art from Phillip may be our only real look at the series, it’s believed these Kenner Jurassic Park Chaos Effect precursor concepts were tied directly to it. Most noticeably, the mech suit is very similar to that of Phillips artwork:

And of course, check out all the art from Phillip below!

The idea of a Jurassic Park primetime animated series was attempted many times over the years, but all became extinct before they were ever even truly alive. While some of the art for the hybrids in this series was a bridge too far for canon, in that era, transmedia story expansions were hardly ever held to continuity, and I would have enjoyed it as its own thing. That said, in today’s world of mega-franchises with expansive expanded universes and spin-offs, I think an animated series would need to stick closer to the source materials content.

While you’re here, check out our exclusive look at the original animated series attempt, ‘Escape from Jurassic Park’, featuring the entire season 1 story treatment! It features an unfinished script, and completely outlines the arc, episode-to-episode – its story goes much further into new territory than the beautiful artwork from William Stout had led us believe!

What do you think of the franchises first real attempts to bring hybrids into the story, prior to Chaos Effect, the Indominus Rex of Jurassic World, and Indoraptor of Fallen Kingdom? What would you have liked to see from this cartoon, and do you think we will ever get a proper Jurassic animated series? Sound off in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost!

Source: Phillip J Felix


‘Jurassic World’ Animation Supervisor Glen McIntosh Holding Lecture This Saturday at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology!

If you’re anywhere near the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Alberta, Canada, you’re in luck! ‘Jurassic World’ Animation Supervisor, Glen McIntosh, is giving a lecture this Saturday May 4th! The lecture will take place on May 4th at 1:30 p.m. in the auditorium, where Glen will talk about realistic creature design and animation.

As a bonus, Glen will be signing original artwork (limited supplies) in the museum lobby after the talk, which is not to be missed!

The lecture is free with admission, so if you’re an artist of any kind, or just a movie or dinosaur fan, it’s something you don’t want to miss! Glen has worked on numerous Jurassic projects, including Jurassic Park 3, World, and Fallen Kingdom, and has worked with both the designs, art, and of course, the animation of the dinosaurs.

Will you be attending? Be sure to share your comments and photos online so!

New Concept Art Shows Alternative Opening, Second Indoraptor, the Spinosaurus, and Early Designs in Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom!

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then this article will one of our most dense to date. Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom has released on Blu-ray, DVD and Digital and with that has come a new wave of artwork from making the film. While the retail releases of the movie were quite light on making of content, and didn’t include any deleted scenes, the artwork from various artist who worked on the film have revealed quite a few alternative sequences that didn’t make the final cut.

Take a look at the concept art from the latest Jurassic Park sequel below – whether or not it’s from a cut scene, or art you’ll see reflected in the movie, it’s all sure to please.

Christopher Brändström

The artwork from Christopher Brändström focuses on early passes of the Indoraptor, where the initial plan was to show off a few experiments gone wrong in the development process of the new breed of dinosaurs. Further, it showcases an alternate opening of Fallen Kingdom, serving to introduce the Mosasaurus in the open ocean attacking a whaling vessel.

Jama Jurabaev

Jama’s artwork served as the basis for many keyframes, final approved dinosaur designs, and more. Some of the most striking pieces of art reveal that there were originally meant to be two Indoraptors who would eventually fight, leaving the one we know from the film victorious. Also notable is his early 3D model of the Allosaurus which looks more like the real animal, and the fact the Sinoceratops was to be called Pachyrhinosaurus with no design differences.

Further, his art explored an alternate more intense version of the stampede and raging wildfires, which was later replaced with a more lighthearted adventure action sequence. Finally, two pieces of art also showcase the Spinosaurus, which would have been killed by the T. rex instead of the Carnotaurus.

As time goes on, more artwork will surely be released for Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom. While there are currently no plans for an artbook, and thus no commentary for how the art led to the final designs and story, these images can still be both insightful and captivating as making of content.

Sound off and let us know what your favorite piece is, and if you would eventually like to see art books for various Jurassic Park films!

Source: jamajurabaev, chrisbrandart