Celebrate National Dinosaur Day With The Jurassic World Watch Party – Hosted by Universal Studios on Twitter!

Universal Studios Hollywood have announced a fun opportunity for fans to join in on an exciting screening of the 2015 hit Jurassic World  – with a watch party taking place through the studio’s Twitter Account.

JW Twitter Watch Party. May 29th at 5pm PST. Universal Studios Hollywood. #JurassicWorldWatchParty

The watch along is taking place as part of a wider initiative which Universal Studios are undertaking to entertain fans of the parks whilst they are stuck at home. This initiative is known as #UniversalAtHome, and has been designed to bring fans together during this difficult period.

However, that isn’t all – as the Press Release from the Universal Studios team highlights an exciting addition to this watch along event:

“To help toast the celebration and, for the first time ever, Universal Studios Hollywood is sharing some favorite cocktail recipes from the popular Isla Nu-Bar, located adjacent to the ride. Fans can view the exclusive recipes for Tiki Tai, Bird of Paradise and a non-alcoholic Mai Tai on Universal Studios Hollywood’s website here.”

This is a fun opportunity for fans of all ages to come together and share in a great watch along. We’ve also seen other outlets within the Jurassic community host similar fantastic watch-along experiences for fans, so it is great to see so many people enjoying these films during this lockdown period.

Jurassic World Birds of Paradise Cocktail from Isla Nu-Bar at Universal Studios Hollywood

Will you be joining in on the watch-along this Friday, or have you taken part in any other fun watch-alongs during the lockdown period? Are you a fan of the cocktails from Isla Nu-Bar?

Let us know in the comments below, and stay tuned for the latest news on Jurassic World Dominion and all future Jurassic projects!

‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ Eyeing July to Resume Filming

The production for the sixth Jurassic film, Jurassic World: Dominion has been suspended since March 14th due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, but could there finally be a light at the end of the tunnel?

In an interview with Jurassic Park, Jurassic Park III and Jurassic World: Dominion actor Sam Neill, The Guardian reports that the “hope” is that filming can resume this upcoming July.

The actor and his latest team of Jurassic co-stars were due to start filming in England on Jurassic World III this month, until the pandemic struck, but he said there is still hope that some work can resume in July.

It should be noted that while they’re targeting a July start date, the entire situation remains fluid and unique – meaning further delays may occur to better protect the health and safety of cast and crew, and to fully realize the original vision of the film.

The film still holds it’s June 11, 2021 release date but it remains to be seen if that date will stick. It is likely a short pause of filming could have been handled, but a July re-start will be almost a four month delay. Though it should be noted that Universal Pictures has staked out claim for June 10, 2022 for an “Untitled Universal Event Film”, which very well may be the latest Jurassic Park films new home.

What are your thoughts on filming possibly resuming for Jurassic World: Dominion in July? Do you think that is too soon, or could it even be earlier?Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Source: The Guardian

‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ Will Not Be the End; Start of a ‘New Era’

In perhaps one of the least surprising, but still reassuring to hear confirmations yet, ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ will not mark the end of the Jurassic Park saga. While speaking to Collider, producer Frank Marshall had the following to say about Dominion’s place in the story as a whole:

“No [it’s not the conclusion of the franchise]. It’s the start of a new era. The dinosaurs are now on the mainland amongst us, and they will be for quite some time, I hope.”

This isn’t all that surprising, given the end of ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ and the overall commercial success of the franchise. The dinosaurs are free within the world, and as Eli Mills said: you can’t put it back in the box. The possibilities are limitless now, and with things like a live action series in development at Amblin TV plus director Colin Trevorrow alluding to more films after JW3 in the past, the writing was on the wall.

We’re excited to see where the future of the franchise brings us, especially with possibilities of new writers and directors bringing their own unique styles and ideas to story as it further evolves. Until then, we have ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’, which is expected to resume filming in London shortly after all the proper COVID19 safety protocols are put into place, and schedules are realigned. While ‘Dominion’ may not be the end, we expect it to wrap up the stories of Alan Grant, Ellie Sattler, Ian Malcolm, Claire Dearing, and Owen Grady – the final chaotic turning point of events set into motion after John Hammond brought his dream into reality with Jurassic Park. As for who will lead the future films, we fully expect entirely new faces and stories, but occasional cameos aren’t out of the question.

What do you want to see from the future of Jurassic Park, and what writers or directors would you like to see lead the story forward? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Source: Collider

Sam Neill Suggests Moving ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ Production Down Under Amid Pandemic Delays

Legendary actor Sam Neill, who will be returning as famous paleontologist Alan Grant in Jurassic World Dominion, has floated the idea of moving production to Australia or New Zealand to get things back up and running sooner. In an interview with an Australian radio show (Fitzy and Wippa on Nova), Neill revealed Dominion had finished two weeks of shooting before the coronavirus pandemic halted filming. As he put it, the cast and crew are “in the fridge now” waiting for production to resume.

Neill said he was supposed to be filming his parts for the movie in London, firstly at Pinewood Studios, but flew home to New Zealand as soon as things started shutting down. Not wanting to stay down for long, he remarked, “I’d like to think that maybe we can start or restart in this part of the world.” With the tenuous situation in the UK at the moment, Neill “reckons New Zealand or Australia would be the place to bring it” so filming could start back up sooner.

A move down under for Jurassic World Dominion would shake up production quite a bit for the movie. I think one thing is clear, Jurassic World Dominion should not be rushed. Fans want a good movie, not one that rushes to theaters as quickly as possible. Especially in a time where movies have been delayed for months, a move like that from Universal would simply come off as a cheap cash grab ploy.

Dominion was shut-down mid production, halting the sculpting and designing of dinosaurs, creations of animatronics, and creation of complex props and sets. Dominion was shaping up to feature the most animatronic dinosaurs, both large and small, since the original Jurassic Park films, innovating much like the modern Star Wars films. However, should the production move shops, and the release date be adhered to, these will inevitably be sacrificed to save time and money. This extends to more than animatronics, but the entire artistic vision of the film, putting undue strain on Colin Trevorrow and the actors to speed through the production, and it to be more VFX dependent with far less time.

The other issue is simply one of safety. We know that when movie productions start back up, there’s going to be a lot of safety regulations put into place. We have already seen some of the restrictions the UK is planning on using, and they are STRICT. To the point of having actors six feet apart during scenes, with something as simple as a kiss requiring VFX. These restrictions expand to the crew, meaning things must move far slower, with fewer people, and costing more money. Obviously for a franchise with as much ‘chaos’ as Jurassic, requiring intense filming scenes on both sides of the camera, that probably just will not work. Of course we want this movie to be made, but not so much to the point as we are sacrificing the health and well-being of those working on it – nor the artistic vision of the movie itself. It would be much better to resume work on Dominion once we are cleared to go about business as usual, and of course, with a delayed release date.

Waiting to resume back in London has its benefits too. With all this time Colin and crew have time on their hands to think about the story they are telling and how to make it even better. Scripts constantly change in this business, and sometimes for the better – time is not going to hurt this production, but rushing will. Not to mention that if production is moved to Australia, countless employees who expected to have steady work with Dominion will be out of a job (“Don’t you mean extinct?”). It would not be fair to the people livelihood that depending on this large production, and would only disrupt or perhaps throwaway the hardwork they already put into the films development.

Of course, there may be ways to pick up some side work in Australia and New Zealand, paving the way for a full throttle return to London – but a this point it’s hard to see its longterm benefits, at least without a formal delay and proper plan.

All in all, it’s a better idea just to let things sit for the moment. Give the production some time to breathe as the pandemic subsides – it will benefit so many people in the long run. I know we are all chomping at the bit to see this star-studded Jurassic conclusion, but let’s just remember that this virus requires are absence to die out, not our presence. And if we could only step aside, and trust in nature (plus our health care professionals), Dominion will find a way.

Any thoughts on how COVID19 is affecting movie production? Do you think moving to Australia or New Zealand would actually be a good move for Dominion? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: Nova

I Like His Spirit: Celebrating Irrfan Khan’s Legacy

Many Jurassic fans and cinephiles alike woke up Wednesday with the sad news that prolific film actor Irrfan Khan had passed away.  It’s always hard when someone beloved leaves this world, and it only makes it all the more devastating when they are taken away too soon.

I wanted to take a moment to say goodbye, and thank this incredibly talented actor for his passion, and dedication.

I remember watching the moment Irrfan Khan is introduced as Simon Masrani for the first time on the big screen. You can’t help but smile. Filling the shoes of a John Hammond-like role is no easy task, but Khan did it with such ease in his first few moments on screen, that I was sold. Khan portrays Masrani as a kind-hearted, adventurous soul who wants people to appreciate life and the mystery, and grandness of it all.

Anybody who has watched interviews with Khan, or watched his other work, can see that was the kind of actor and creative person Irrfan Khan was. He valued every little moment and choice.  That spirit is forever captured in film.

For Jurassic fans specifically, we have been gifted with a memorable performance by Khan, that solidified his place in the world created, and also in our hearts. His excitement and love for the dinosaurs and the park that he owned was palpable, and made it all the more fun for us, as viewers, to finally experience a functioning park. His energy, and enthusiasm are infectious and leap off the screen.

Ultimately, that’s what we need right now.  In this time where so much is happening around us, and after loosing such a talented person, we can find strength and reassurance in the characters Khan left behind for us to treasure forever.

Check out Our Interview With Joseph Mazzello About All Things Jurassic Park and World!

Are you looking forward to tonight’s ‘Watch from Home’ party of Jurassic Park, hosted by Joseph Mazzello? While you know him as Tim Murphy from Jurassic Park, his career has been incredibly diverse, with roles in films like The Social Network, and most recently starring as John Deacon in Bohemian Rhapsody.

We were lucky enough to chat with Joe about all things Jurassic Park, Jurassic World, and dinosaur. We cover a variety of subjects, such as runaway raptors, deleted scenes, and where his character may be today.

Tonight’s watch party starts at 8pm EST, and can be watched in the embeded video above once live. Until then, be sure to read our interview below!

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You have an upcoming Jurassic Park ‘watch from home’ with IGN, can you tell us a little bit more about that?

JM: I was approached by Universal first, and I really jumped at the chance! The last time I saw it was in 3D in theatres -a bunch of my friends made me go watch myself, and have their 3D glasses on and look at the screen and look at me back and forth like that for 2 and half hours. That was a chance to really think about what a great movie it was and how it still holds up today. You know I would hold it up against any action movie, any monster movie, really anything. I just think the visual effects hold up really well, the story is beautiful. Spielberg the way he was an artist with every shot, every single one, and you still feel it to this day- the care he took with everything. So any chance that I get to kinda come back to the fans a little bit. If there’s one constant in my entire life, it is guys around my age telling me that they went and saw Jurassic Park 4, 5, 6, or 7 times in theatres and telling me how much they identified with me. They wanted to be me when they were growing up. Stuff like that warms my heart, knowing that I could be apart of something that was so special in people’s lives. To be able to do it for as many people as possible while we’re all at home, we’re all trying to deal with these strange and heartbreaking events together is a great escape for us. Its a way for us to come together and enjoy a great film and impart my insight about it and great memories, and I can wait to do it.

I’ve grown up with Jurassic Park, I’m too young to have seen the original in theaters, but I grew up with it on VHS and it was always a really big part of my life, especially with dinosaurs because ultimately it guided me to go to school for paleontology — though I eventually shifted over to film. But Jurassic Park has been kind of a constant in my life, so outside of Jurassic Park, do you have a continued relationship with dinosaurs, going to the museum or anything along those lines?

JM: Well it’s funny, I have a five year old nephew now who is of course obsessed with dinosaurs. So I’ve been waiting for all this to be over so I can take him to the Natural History Museum in New York and kind of spur his excitement about this thing that was such a big part of my childhood. I think that I’m reliving a lot of it because of him, it’s probably close association with dinosaurs themselves. Jurassic Park of course I live everyday, but dinosaurs, it’s fun to see how excited kids can get about them.

Outside of the Jurassic Park films, do you have a favorite dinosaur that you like that wasn’t a part of the films?

JM: Oh man, that’s tricky looking at Jurassic Park ,and with all the sequels, you see a much bigger variety than you see in the first film. Even like the ‘pterodactyls’… When you saw them in some of the sequels, like in Jurassic World, I thought that was pretty awesome.

So have you kept up with the sequels then?

JM: I have yeah, absolutely! I usually don’t go see them in theaters and then once they kinda…you know I get recognized a lot from the original film. So I try to see them a little more in private now. But yeah, I watched them.

So here’s a question, and its probably a bit of an oddball one but it might the type of thing you would get from a jurassic park fan site. Over the years, Jurassic Park 3 and Jurassic World, had a very long development with many different stories. Was there ever a time that you were potentially going to be involved with Jurassic Park 3 or Jurassic Park 4.

JM: You know, I don’t know if I was. It was probably something that was discussed internally. No one at the time reached out to me about those two films in particular. Obviously, The Lost World, Steven called right away and kinda have me and Arianna come in there, and advance the ball and kind of away we go with the film. And even that was so much fun. But no, in terms of Jurassic World, but if they did, I wasn’t privy to it.

Do you think Tim would have visited Jurassic World when it opened? Do you think that’s something his character would like to do?

JM: My goodness, its funny because I feel there’s still so much character and you could go so many different ways with it. You could go the way it was a traumatizing event and his love for dinosaurs kind of faded – or became a fear instead of a love. Or you could do that it was something more, and he’s a average kid and being the grandson of John Hammond and being the heir to these things that he might want to get involved. But being at the park as a spectator, we could go either way with that, but either way it would be interesting.

It would be interesting to see his character’s perspective. Its funny, there was a comic book series released called Jurassic Park Redemption that featured an adult Tim and he kind of started his own little park, and his rules were no carnivore’s this time and lets do it right, and of course the scientists didn’t listen and things went astray. It would be one of those things that fans have wanted to see where Tim’s role would go. Tim and Lex have a legacy with Hammond and they probably still fit into the puzzle somewhere.

JM: I hope one day that’s something that gets answered. There is so much you can do with these characters and its such a phenomenal franchise that has grown and now been beloved across generations. It’s still a character that is near and dear to my heart and there is so much you can do with him going forward.

Now with Jurassic Park, I’m sure you get asked this a lot, what’s your favorite filming story.

JM: The one that stood out to me, there’s obviously a couple, the Hurricane Inniki, which at the time was the biggest hurricane to hit the US. The fact that was going to be happening, and on the last day of shooting [before halting for the hurricane] we wake up in the morning and they say we’re going to evacuate — but then Steven comes in and says ‘no, we’re going to hangout here, let it pass over us’. We ended up having the entire crew in the ballroom together like it was camp, and the craft services and caterers had a bunch of food for us, they brought in all the lawn chairs from the pool and we all just hung out as this hurricane was coming in. And Steven, because he was so passionate about what he does, and he’s such a perfectionist and has a love for film, his emotion behind this was “I’ve got to go out there and film this thing as it’s approaching, and maybe use it for the movie”. I guess having that kind of personality at the helm, it made me love acting and potentially directing which I ended up doing, only grew. It was something I found so inspiring. It was such a wild and crazy time thinking about how my mom and brother and sister were at home – there were no cell phones and all the phone lines were down so they didn’t know what happened to us. Such a wild time in our lives.

Onset though, a story I tell a bunch that I’m sure you guys know, but on my birthday, we were doing the kitchen scene and I’m supposed to be running to the freezer. I’ve got my limp going and I’m running to the freezer, and the Raptor is supposed to take a right and I’m supposed to take a left. Well the raptor was on wheels and being pushed since it was such a fast shot. The guys lost control of it and it ended up going left with me, and I turned around and its claw hit me in the head. I got knocked down on the floor! Steven came running over to see if I was okay. I was a little bit dizzy but I was alright. And Steven said “well this is as good a time as any, ready everybody?” and he starts singing happy birthday! I had Happy birthday sung to me by the entire crew of Jurassic Park, which was such a wild thing. And after that Steven actually asked me if we could film a little bit more, but at that point I was a little bit out of it. So he said “okay I think we got it, we got it”.

That’s a testament to working with practical animatronic dinosaurs I suppose – they really do make it real, on and off screen.

JM: Absolutely. It was funny too because it sort of played out the way it does in the movie where you’re waiting to see the dinosaurs and don’t really see them. Because first we started shooting in Hawaii, the first things we did mostly were CGI stuff. So it was like the Gallimimus around us that were not there. Then the T. rex coming out and eating one of them, that was just someone holding a big piece of wood that was like two stories high with a Tyrannosaur head made of cardboard on top of it, and guys moving it up and down. And then when we ultimately got to LA and started shooting in the studios we started working with dinosaurs every single day, and at last the Trex. It became so unbelievable how massive these machines were, and Steven would sometimes call me out of school on set, and show me them because he knew I was so interested and he’s got that childhood imagination and still has it. So he always wanted to show me these incredible dinosaurs they were building. Every day on set was wonderful. They were the best days possible, and even the worst day was still better than bad days I had on any other set.

It seems like for everyone involved in the movie, the production was something special and the movie itself with the visual effects, with what Stan Winston Studios did with the animatronics, what ILM did with the CG animals, what really is revolutionary on so many fronts, I think on top of the wonderful story, the great directing, the great acting, its one of the many reason it has held up and is so near and dear to so many people’s hearts.

JM: I agree. Like I said, after Jurassic Park because the CGI was so brilliant, movies started leaning on CGI too much and that continues to this day where a lot of films look like cartoons. As good as CGI often is, you still know when you can actually reach out and touch something. There’s something to be said, even the puppeteering back in the day, even if they looked a little wonky, you still know it was there. I think that’s also what helps make the originals so iconic. And the other thing is, it’s really a small story if you think about it. Like what is the movie Jurassic Park really about? Yes it’s about dinosaurs, it’s about monsters, it’s about the chase, it’s about all of that. But it’s really about very few people stuck in a small place, and this guy who doesn’t want to have children who is forced to take care of two of them in a dire situation, and learns to love them. That at its core is so Spielberg. It’s a story about a father, a family, a member that pushes against it but ultimately finding that redemption, and finding that love. I just think that when a story can play out on the small personal level, and play out on a grand scale, when those things come together you can tell it’s a classic and that’s what Jurassic Park is.

We talk about it a lot, the sense of intimacy across the board in the original Jurassic Park is what makes it so relatable on a character level, makes the story so engaging, which ultimately makes the action so believable. There’s a certain tactile sense to it that makes the story really resonate, and the things that play out visually really anchor to reality. Like you said with CG, one of the things about shooting practical is that practical has limitations and imperfections like the real world has limitations and imperfections.

JM: Right!

And sometimes I see CG, beautiful and incredible work, but it almost starts to break the sense of believability when everything is so beautiful, so incredible. The sunsets are so perfect, the mountain range so ideally placed that, while it looks photoreal but you as an audience member know its not real, and the illusion breaks. It’s interesting how Jurassic Park, being out there on location as much, embracing these ‘limitations’ made it feel all the more genuine.

JM: Right and thats not to say that brilliant, brilliant films haven’t been made using CGI almost completely but I think that there’s still that feeling you want to have something tangible there to hold onto as the audience. Something that you know is there, something that is real that you get invested in. Because when the more you can make people feel actual danger, the more invested you’re going to get, the more you are going to feel the plight of those characters.

Absolutely. You talked about the Raptor in the kitchen and how it hit you but what do you think has happened to that Raptor that got locked in the freezer. Where do you think that Raptor is today?

JM: Well it probably ate a lot of frozen meatballs. So it did okay, for a little while anyway. But who knows, maybe one day there will be a sequel in the works about the frozen raptor.

The frozen raptor being thawed out. On its revenge spree.

JM: Exactly. I think it’s perfect. Who knows what sub-zero temperatures do to dinosaurs. We’re about to find out!

Exactly, but we’ll probably have to wait for Jurassic Park 27 on the moon. Jurassic Moon.

Ok, so I imagine you’ve been asked this before, but when you’re in the Ford Explorer tour vehicle in Jurassic Park, the T. rex pushes its head down through the viewing dome — I guess when the window is on top of you and Arrianna Richards, a part of the window had broken off? Which was not supposed to happen.

JM: That’s correct.

Was that a scarier moment when that happened?

JM: You know, in real life, these are really heavy machines that are being handled by people in a remote way. And so there was inherent danger just even if they were big blocks, the fact that they were being controlled and brought towards you. And it was supposed to hit the plexiglass, it was supposed to come down. But it was not supposed to come down with that kind of force that it would actually come down that far, and actually break the plexiglass in half. Actually, you can see it in the movie that there’s a quick shot of the Trex with a missing tooth in that moment because the tooth fell out when it hit the glass, and they tried for like half an hour to get it back in and it wasn’t sticking, so we just said screw it we’ll just do it without it. So that’s a good little thing to watch out for, not an Easter egg. But it’s something funny to watch out for if you can pause it.

Another question a lot of people had, are there any notable deleted scenes that your character was involved in?

JM: Oh boy, I don’t think that’s a question I’ve ever been asked. I don’t think there was anything that I was in, a scene, that was cut. I’m sure in the original script there were things that were cut or moved around. There were certain shots I remember that were cut out. There was one in particular where when the self driving vehicles were on the track, we were supposed to go over this land bridge – a real land bridge in Hawaii – that had no guards on either side of it, they were supposed to have us go over it but we were like “no way”. So they have some doubles in the car of us, and have it go over the bridge for us. But that was something that was cut, I’m not sure why. They were little shots like that, but I can’t think of any scene in particular.

I believe one of the scenes people were questioning was I think in the children’s novelization, it talks about a scene where Grant starts talking about the Tyrannosaurus after the attack, while Lex and Tim are in the storm drain, but he realizes they are too traumatized to continue the conversation. So a lot of people wondered if that was filmed, or was that just part of the novelization from the script.

JM: That was not something that I remember filming. I can say with 99.9% certainty that we did not film it.

Okay! Another question we got was what was the hair and makeup process for making your electrocuted look.

JM: Ha! I can’t totally remember but it was my hair. Boy I wish I could remember. Monty Hall, I think he did the make up. But I can’t totally remember but it didn’t take any longer than usual. Pretty much a lot of hairspray to make it stand up. Actually Spielberg always had an issue with me coming to the set, my hair was always too neat in his opinion. And so whenever I would come on set, and no matter what, he would come over to me and rub his fingers through my hair, and just jostle it around a little just to make sure it was always messy. But I can’t quite remember the process but if I could I would do it again. For the IGN Watch From Home.

Are there any small details that Jurassic “superfans” would appreciate or know or what to know from your experiences?

JM: I think the answer to that question has to be join us tonight, because when I watch the movie is when all these things really come rushing back to me. I’m gonna try my best to really try and dig into the depths of my brain to remember every little moment.

Do you keep up with the Jurassic Park community to a degree just to see what people are talking about or are interested in over the years?

JM: I will say they definitely keep up with me. I get great messages all the time from Jurassic Park fans, and I’ve had a lot of great conversations around the world with people who love the film so it keeps me up to date just having people who enjoy these films so much. It makes me feel a part of the family which is a wonderful thing because it’s such a wonderful franchise to be part of, they’re making great movies and my hope is we keep seeing Jurassic Park a long way into the future.

Absolutely.

We wanted to end this with a huge thank you to Joe for taking the time to do this interview with us, and chat all things Jurassic. You can follow him on his Twitter here, and Instagram here. We hope to see you tonight during the Watch from Home stream!


Universal Pictures Trademarks New Video Game ‘Jurassic World Aftermath’!

In 2016 Perfect World Entertainment were in development on a new video game titled Jurassic World Survivor, which was rumoured to take place immediately after the events in Jurassic World. The game was described as an open world third person survival game taking place on Isla Nublar. However, it wasn’t long before we learned that the game had ceased development.


Development footage of the cancelled game ‘Jurassic World Survivor’

This certainly is nothing new to Jurassic fans who are all too familiar with video game cancellations, but don’t get too sad just yet. Universal Pictures have now registered a new trademark – Jurassic World Aftermath, which is also for a video game. The application was filed on 14th April and appears to be strikingly similar to the trademark for Survivor.

The description provided to the USPTO for JURASSIC WORLD AFTERMATH is Recorded interactive multi-media software for playing games; downloadable interactive multi-media software for playing games; downloadable software in the nature of a mobile application for playing games and accessing entertainment content for use with computers, portable handheld digital electronic communication devices, mobile devices, wired and wireless communication devices, and video game consoles; recorded computer game software for wireless and electronic mobile devices, mobile phones, hand-held electronic devices, and video game consoles; downloadable computer game software for wireless and electronic mobile devices, mobile phones, hand-held electronic devices, and video game consoles; computer game discs; video game discs; wireless communication devices and wireless communication systems comprised of computer hardware and recorded software for the transmission of audio, voice, and images; recorded computer virtual reality game software; downloadable virtual reality game software.

We’re going to hazard a guess that Aftermath is what Survivor has become, and that the game will follow a similar story to what we came to learn about it’s predecessor. As the previous developer of ‘Survivor’ Cryptic Studios Seattle has closed, we’re unsure how much content from that game can be utilized, but logically speaking they may be picking up from where Cryptic left off. No word on a developer at this point, but word is some well known studios were exploring the Jurassic IP over the last year or so.

The domain name JurassicWorldAftermath.com was also registered on 14th April, the same day as the trademark, however the owner of this domain cannot be verified at this time.

We know very little about the game, but what we came to learn about Jurassic World Survivor was that it was an open world third person survival game that takes place on Isla Nublar, shortly after the events in Jurassic World. The game centered around player-created characters that have to survive the subsequent carnage that the Indominus Rex created on the island.

The story may have changed and this may be a completely different game, but the title alone leads us to believe this video game will indeed take place after the events seen in Jurassic World.

Stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more on this upcoming video game and be sure to sound off in the comments below (except for you Ben) on what you’d like to see in a Jurassic World video game!

Sources: Trademarkia

An Update About ‘Jurassic World’ Productions and Note to Fans Amidst Current Circumstances

We’re living in unique, uneasy, uncertain, and unprecedented times.

Due to the global spread of COVID-19, better known as the ‘Coronavirus’, and the widespread public safety precautions being enacted across the globe, most industries have ground to a halt. While we know it can be frustrating to know delays are looming on the horizon, it’s important to remember how crucial it is to put the health and safety of others first. ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ has halted filming, and will likely see a delay as the global pandemic continues to be an issue, ‘Jurassic World: Live Tour’ has been formally shutdown and cancelled, and the fate of ‘Camp Cretaceous’ remains unknown as DreamWorks has shifted to work from home.

In these times of social distancing, it’s easy to feel isolated – and it’s up to us find new ways to entertain, support, and interact as the world experiences this together. In that sense, we’ve all never been closer together. Be safe, help flatten that curve, stream more Netflix than ever before, and turn to the Jurassic community online if you’re looking for a distraction. We’ll be here.

To accompany this, we’ve decided to to publish director Colin Trevorrow’s note to the ‘Dominion’ crew – his words not only apply to those working on the film, but to the fans in the community. Read his words below, and stay safe out there.


Crew,

I know most of us were together Friday night when the news broke, but now that we’ve all had a chance to process, a quick note.

One of the things I’ve found to be true, time and again, is that opportunities can be found in the worst of news. Sometimes it’s an opportunity to appreciate something you may have taken for granted. Or just to take a step back and look at the world around you and your place in it. While this is a frustrating delay—especially as we’ve started to hit a real stride together—I hope all of us take a moment to recognize how lucky we are to tell stories for a living. Especially stories with dinosaurs in them. It’s a gift.

The most invigorating surprise for me on this production so far is how strong we are together. This crew is a well-oiled machine of human ingenuity, the kind of rare army my mentors have built over decades of work together. But every part of our group matters equally—none of us are expendable or replaceable. That’s why we’re being so careful. I want to finish the game with the team I took the field with.

So take care of yourselves, be vigilant. Value this time with your partners and children. Call your parents. We’re making a film about the need for all living things to take care of each other, with our own survival in the balance. It’s a message that matters.

Thank you again for your brilliant work so far. We’ll finish the job together soon.

ct

‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ Halts Production Over Coronavirus Concerns

Following Netflix and Disney’s lead, Universal Pictures has begun shuttering it’s live-action productions around the world including ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ over fears of the globally spreading Coronavirus COVID-19.

The spread of the Coronavirus COVID-19 was finally reclassified earlier this week by the WHO has a pandemic, with over 148,000 cases have been reported in around 140 countries and territories; more than 5,500 people have died from the disease. More and more governments are restricting travel and imposing quarantines to slow the spread of the virus.

‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ began shooting earlier this week in the London area of the United Kingdom, with the rest of the country bracing for a surge of cases, execs at the studio decided that for the safety of all those in the production, it would be best to shutdown for an unknown period of time until a better determination can be made. Other Universal productions ‘Flint Strong’ and the untitled Billy Eichner project have also gone on hiatus from Friday.

It is unclear at this time whether or not the delay will impact the June 2021 release date, Universal’s other mainstay ‘Fast and Furious’ franchise has already delayed its next entry by a year.

How do you feel about the delay? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: Variety

Live-Action ‘Jurassic World’ Series in Development with Justin Falvey and Darryl Frank at Amblin TV!

Hold on to your butts, dinosaur fans! While ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ has just begun filming, we’ve learned AMBLIN TELEVISION has begun developing a live-action Jurassic World series! Not much is known at this time, however the series has enlisted Jurassic alumni Colin Trevorrow and Steven Spielberg as producers, alongside newcomers Justin Falvey, and Darryl Frank! It currently lists Vancouver, Canada as its primary production location, which is a film and TV hotspot, and where Jurassic World 3 did some filming recently.

Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey are the co-president’s of Amblin Television, where they oversees all development, production and programming for the company. The two currently serve as executive producers on all Amblin Television productions. Both recently served as executive producers on the acclaimed series The Americans on FX, starring Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys as KGB spies living in the US, which has been honored with four Emmys, a Golden Globe, two Peabody Awards, Critics Choice Award and is a perennial recipient of the AFI Award for TV Program of the Year.

While the plot remains more mysterious than the fate of Isla Sorna, the series is said to be part of the same continuity as the films, and tie into the upcoming ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’. The current state of its development and release date also remain under tight wraps, however its tie into the upcoming Jurassic Park sequel lead us to believe it’s aiming for a late 2021 or 2022 release. The platform also is unknown, however if we had to hazard a guess our eyes are on Universal Pictures streaming service “Peacock”.

It’s worth noting that the times are still early, and the series is listed as in ‘development’ rather than ‘active development’, which means things are still very much in flux. As the series continues to push forward in development we expect more news to hit, so stay tuned. How do you feel about a possible Jurassic World series? Sound off in the comments!